12-14-2018 11:13:25 AM -0800
12-14-2018 10:00:59 AM -0800
12-13-2018 04:11:41 PM -0800
12-13-2018 01:40:43 PM -0800
12-13-2018 09:55:34 AM -0800
It looks like you've previously blocked notifications. If you'd like to receive them, please update your browser permissions.
Desktop Notifications are  | 
Get instant alerts on your desktop.
Turn on desktop notifications?
Remind me later.
PJ Media encourages you to read our updated PRIVACY POLICY and COOKIE POLICY.
X


23K Sign Petition Demanding Starbucks Keep Promise to Remove Porn From Wi-Fi

In 2014, the Internet safety group Enough Is Enough (EIE) led a coalition of 75 organizations and nearly 50,000 petitioners in calling on Starbucks and other companies to prevent access to pornography on their complimentary Wi-Fi service. In 2016, Starbucks promised to consider such an action, but has not yet fulfilled that pledge.

"By breaking its commitment, Starbucks is keeping the doors wide open for convicted sex offenders and others to fly under the radar from law enforcement and use free, public Wi-Fi services to access illegal child porn and hard-core pornography," EIE President and CEO Donna Rice Hughes declared in a statement Monday. Her organization relaunched an updated petition today that will add additional names to the 50,000-plus signers from the launch of the campaign.

More than 23,000 people have signed a new CitizenGo petition denouncing the coffee company for breaking its promise. "Apparently, Starbucks cares more about providing paper straws to protect the environment than protecting kids and patrons on its public Wi-Fi," the petition quips.

In July 2016, a Starbucks representative told CNN, "We are in the process of evaluating a global protocol to address this in all of our company-owned stores, and are in active discussions with organizations on implementing the right, broad-based solution that would remove any illegal and other egregious content."

EIE launched a national campaign thanking Starbucks for this move, but the petition adds, "To date, no action has taken place to suggest Starbucks has moved forward with its public commitment." McDonalds and Chick-fil-A have already removed access to pornography on their Wi-Fi.

Hughes insisted that Starbucks' promise is vital to protecting customers who use the Internet. "Having unfiltered hotspots also allows children and teens to easily bypass filters and other parental control tools set up by their parents on their smart phones, tablets and laptops," she argued.

"Starbucks has had a tremendous opportunity to put its best foot forward in protecting its customers from images deemed obscene and illegal under the law, but they haven’t budged, despite their promise two years ago and despite the fact that they voluntarily filter this same content in the UK," Hughes insisted.

Starbucks did not respond to PJ Media's request for comment, to give their own version of the story, by press time.

In a statement to PJ Media, Hughes announced that EIE is reaching out to its partners for the current campaign, launched last week. Allies from the previous campaign include Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF), the American Family Association (AFA), the Center for Family and Human Rights (C-FAM), CitizenGo, Concerned Women for America, the Family Research Council (FRC), Girls Against Porn & Human Trafficking, the Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA), the National Salvation Army, and many others.