Is Heaven Is for Real... Real?

The much-anticipated movie 'Heaven is for Real' is set to open in movie theaters on Wednesday. The book tells the story of Colton Burpo, a little boy who claimed he visited heaven during a near-death experience.

"Heaven tourism" books have proliferated Christian best-seller lists in recent years, but are the accounts authentic, fictional, based on hallucinations, or something else? Moreover, do they comport with the Bible's descriptions of heaven and the afterlife?

Pastor and author David Platt says no.

He describes 'Heaven is for Real' as "A fanciful account of a four-year-old boy who talks about how he went to heaven and got a halo and wings, but he didn't like them because they were too small. He claims that he sat on Jesus' lap while angels sang to him," Platt said. "He even met the Holy Spirit, whom he describes as 'kind of blue.'

Platt said that "There is money to be made in peddling fiction about the afterlife as non-fiction in the Christian publishing world today" and "The whole premise behind every single one of these books is contrary to everything God's word says about heaven," including their "relentless self-focus."

According to Platt, "Scripture definitely says that people do not go to heaven and come back. 'Who has ascended to heaven and come down?' (Proverbs 30:4). Answer: 'No one has ascended into heaven except he who has descended from heaven -- the Son of Man'" (John 3:13).

"Four biblical authors had visions about heaven and wrote about what they saw: Isaiah, Ezekiel, Paul and John," Platt said. "All of them were prophetic visions, not near-death experiences. Not one person raised from dead in the Old Testament or the New Testament ever wrote down what he or she experienced in heaven, including Lazarus, who had a lot of time in a grave --  four days."

But all of the biblical authors agree perfectly: "Their visions are all fixated on the glory of God which defines heaven and illuminates everything there. They are overwhelmed, chagrined, petrified, and put to silence by the sheer majesty of God's holiness." Platt said that notably missing from all the biblical accounts are "the frivolous features and juvenile attractions that seem to dominate every account of heaven currently on the bestseller list."

He said we need to "minimize the thoughts of man and magnify, trust -- let's bank our lives and our understanding of the future on -- the truth of God." He said that rather than relying on traditions, we should depend on the word of God. "There's too much at stake in our lives and others' lives for that."