Near-Death Experiences—A New Take on Life, Part 4: Brian Miller’s Case Challenges the Skeptics


During the 45 minutes that Brian Miller’s heart and brain were not functioning, the medical staff shocked him four times—to no avail. Then, suddenly, his heart started beating normally again—as far as they could make out, on its own.

As the same nurse, Emily Bishop, told a local TV station: “The fact that he is up walking, talking, everything—I mean that’s amazing.” Miller is fully recovered, with no brain damage or other loss of function—something that, according to medical knowledge, was not “supposed to happen.”

But Miller claimed that, during the time he was clinically dead, something transpired. As he told it: “The only thing I remember, I started seeing a light and started walking towards the light.”

He said there were flowers along the path, and after a while his mother-in-law—who had died a week earlier—appeared, with his deceased father-in-law in the background.

“She was,” he said,

the most beautiful thing when I seen her. It was like the first day I met her. And looked so happy. She grabbed a hold of my arm and she told me, "It’s not your time, you don’t need to be here…you’ve got things to go down and do."

To say that Miller revived because someone in the afterlife urged him to is not, of course, considered medically or scientifically valid. But even though the CPR efforts seem to have helped to an extent, the same nurse says of the case as a whole: “It gives you the chills.”

She is hardly alone in such a reaction; here, among countless other examples,  the late, leading cardiologist Lloyd Rudy expresses similar amazement at NDE phenomena he saw in his practice.