Surviving a Scandal With Humor and Aplomb

Mandy Rice-Davies, left, and Christine Keeler, pictured in 1963. Mandy Rice-Davies, left, and Christine Keeler, pictured in 1963.

The Telegraph shares words of wisdom on how to survive a scandal from Mandy Rice-Davis, the former model who, as part of the Profumo affair helped bring down Harold McMillan's government:

At the launch of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s new musical about the scandal, Stephen Ward, Rice-Davies declared that Profumo’s error was lying about his affair with Christine Keeler: “Had he actually stood up and told the truth, he would probably have gone to the back benches, maybe.”

Rowan Pelling from The Telegraph adds that:

However, I feel Rice-Davies would have even more pearls of wisdom about the role of humour in extremis. One key difference between the blonde bombshell and the more self-contained Keeler is that Rice-Davies always had a joke on her lips and a wink to the gallery. It was she who perkily declared to a packed court, on being told Lord Astor denied having an affair with her: “He would, wouldn’t he?” The Welsh-born glamour puss looked like she was playing a leading role in “Carry On Profumo”, and enjoying every second of it.

I don't know.  I tend to think it is best not to be involved -- much less caught in flagrante -- in scandals of this nature, and that when caught one should have to pay no matter how charming or humorous.

However, I must say Rice-Davies' approach seems preferable to our current public personages who seem to cover a scandal with a new and worse one.

Photo via Keystone.