7 Objections to Homeschooling Teens


3. We'd get sick of each other by week four two.

“I wouldn’t want my kids home all day — I don’t have the patience.” I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve heard this when I told people we were homeschooling. I’ve always been tempted to respond, “What does it say about your parenting that you have raised children you can’t stand to be around?” It sometimes seems like people have children and then immediately begin counting the days until they can put them on the school bus so they can have some peace and quiet. Some of this is because parents know what their children are like when they get off that bus: cranky, exhausted, and not especially pleasant to be with. They don’t realize that homeschooling changes the whole family dynamic. A family that spends all or most of its time together not only avoids the jarring transition from school to home every day, but also gets to spend the best part of the day together. During that time, parents constantly mentor their children and model good behavior for them. One of the blessings of homeschooling is that the children are more influenced by their parents than their peers and so they naturally enjoy being together, even in the teen years.

Before we had kids of our own, my husband and I volunteered as youth leaders in our church and there met our first homeschooling families. We were shocked to meet teens who not only weren't embarrassed to be around their parents, but who actually enjoyed being with them. These kids actually volunteered their parents when we needed chaperons for a sleepover or a retreat. Though we saw this occasionally from public school students, it was consistent with the homeschooled kids, one of the rewards of spending so much time together.