Evolving on Guns: Considering the Morality of Gun Ownership Now That I Refuse to Be a Victim

But there is comfort and peace in knowing that God is ultimately in control. When Joseph’s brothers treacherously sold him into slavery, God used him in Egypt to save his family and many others from a massive regional famine. After his father Jacob’s death, Joseph told his brothers, "As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive"(Genesis 50:20).

Knowing that God knows the end from the beginning and that He has a purpose in it all brought peace, comfort, and rest from the fear that tormented me prior to my reconciliation to God through Christ.

So why do I need a gun to protect myself if I believe God is in control and “for those who love God all things work together for good” (Romans 8:28)? For the same reason I feed myself and take antibiotics if I have an infection. For the reason I would take radiation or chemotherapy if it would kill cancer that had invaded my body. My body is the temple of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19) and when God provides the means to take care of that temple and keep it alive, we should take advantage of it, whether that means protecting it from invading cancer cells or from a terrorist.

In addition to protecting my own body, I must also consider that my act of self-defense to stop a violent criminal could be a way to show love to my neighbors by stopping the invader from harming untold numbers of others. If I have the opportunity to stop this person from committing violence against my neighbors, it seems that I would have a moral imperative to do so.