Bitter Clingers Have Taken Over Your Television, or How America Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Duck

I find the Robertson brand of tolerance more genuinely American than the liberal brand of tolerance that dominates American media and which, in my experience, means, “Be reasonable. See things my way.”

That’s not to say that the Duck Commanders accept the current state of affairs in this country. While Uncle Si can easily discuss the finer points of Star Wars and the Black Eyed Peas (both the band and the entree), his brother Phil often waxes philosophical on the perceived softness and helplessness of today’s youth, the wastefulness of modern culture, the destructive distraction of electronic devices, the oppressiveness of office work, and the restorative power of getting back to the woods -- something most of his viewers have probably never done.

In the end, Duck Dynasty is just televised entertainment made to peddle consumer products at commercial breaks. Sure, the reality it presents is not entirely real. Many of the weekly scenarios feel like they’re lifted straight from an episode of I Love Lucy. But Duck Dynasty reminds us that a huge majority of gun-owning Americans use firearms responsibly and don’t need to be controlled, that the American dream still comes true if you only follow the formula, that you really can “build that” on your own, and that each days ends a little better when we return thanks to the One who provided it, and for the ones who make it worth living.