The Tsarnaev Brothers and the Coming Savage Empire of Islam

It is interesting, and not insignificant, that one of the Tsarnaev brothers is named Tamerlan, after the great Islamic Uzbek conquerer Tamerlane.

In 1401, when Tamerlane took the Syrian city of Haleb, the inhabitants were filled with terror as he and his warriors seized booty and took lives. But the mere killing of human beings did not satisfy the bloody desires of Tamerlane --he needed to kill with sadistic creativity. He had entire multitudes of people holocausted, their heads severed, and several towers erected out of their skulls. (3)

He took a suburb of Haleb; he threw its inhabitants into the city's moat and posted timber over them while they were still alive. He promised to spare some of the inhabitants, and kindly ordered them all to go into a large mosque, having it filled until there were thirty thousand people -- both young and old. He sealed all entrances and had the building scorched.

He commanded each and every one of his men to bring him "the head of a man." It took three days for them to gather a sufficient number of heads. Sufficient for what you ask? For three towers of skulls to be built. (4)

Tamerlane's nature was closer to the original state of Islam, and now we are seeing the resuscitation of this violence. It is here in America, and it will be growing ever stronger as long as we continue to refuse to put away our fixation on tolerance.

There are two more important questions that our civilization must comprehend: What is our culture founded on, and what is trying to destroy it? Our nation was founded on Judeo-Christian principles, and Islam strives to obliterate them. It is up to us to realize this, and if we refuse to do so, we will only be denying ourselves.



  • (1) Ghaith Abdul-Ahad, Syria: the foreign fighters joining the war against Bashar al-Assad, published by The Guardian
  • (2)┬áHertado de Mendoza, The War in Granada, 2.9, trans. Martin Shuttleworth, London: The Folio Society (1982)
  • (3) Arabshah, Life of Timur, McCullough, Chronicles of the Barbarians, ch. xiv, p. 306
  • (4) Schiltberger, Travels and Bondage, in McCullough, Chronicles of the Barbarians, ch. xiv, pp. 313-315