A Parent Guide to Teachers' Unions

Another step -- “Nail the Negotiator”:

Read a statement to the Board and/or press stating that the Board should not spend this money to fill such a position [legal representation] of negotiating against teachers when the money could best be used to educate children.

Again, Strongsville is a textbook case of Rules for Radicals. This time, it's Alinsky Rule #13: “Pick the target, freeze it, personalize it, and polarize it.” In addition to their ongoing attacks on substitute teachers and Board members, the Strongsville Education Association (SEA) has savaged the law firm representing the Board.

The handbook says the Board can be pressured into firing their negotiator, giving the advantage to the union, which has almost unlimited resources available through the NEA.

The SEA pulled this trick with a sketchy-looking PDF linked from their Facebook page with no documentation and no link to the “recent article in The Plain Dealer”:

A recent article in The Plain Dealer detailed the 12 teacher strikes that have occurred in Ohio’s public schools since the year 2000. ... Upon examining the negotiation process, the name of one out-of-town attorney appears: Bill Pepple. Even when teachers are not forced to strike, Bill Pepple has a history of acrimonious negotiations. ... These three communities were the lucky ones -- others, as we have seen, suffer quite a different fate.

The information has been widely circulated over social media, including several Tweets I received from an anonymous union supporter. Whether or not it’s true, the goal is to strip any advantage from the Board (representing the taxpayers, remember) while at the same time making them look like greedy, unfeeling corporate lawyers and bureaucrats.