How Many Bad Movies Did They Cram into The Incredible Burt Wonderstone?


The answer to this question is a resounding, “Who cares?” Anton is such an irrelevant dweeb, and Burt and Steve are such obnoxious egomaniacs, that there is no one to root for in the movie. Olivia Wilde, as the magicians’ assistant Jane (the film’s example of a big funny is for Burt to refer to her as “Nicole”), stands in for the audience, chafing at the lameness of Burt and Steve’s act and rolling her eyes at Burt’s lechery. Why doesn’t she leave if she can’t stand these guys? Maybe because the filmmakers don’t want the viewers to follow her example.

In one of many tiresome would-be comic set pieces, Burt chickens out of a stunt involving being locked in a plexiglass cube suspended above the broiling Las Vegas strip, blames Anton and fires him, yet is so dumb that he tries to continue a two-man magic act by himself. How did such a moron rise to the level of sold-out attraction in the first place? And why does his supposedly hard-headed boss (James Gandolfini) keep the act going even when their audience has disappeared? Bigger problem: What happened to the sweet, lonely Burt from the beginning of the movie? Seeing how a talented, likable old-school entertainer adapted to new realities might have been fun, but no amount of payback can be sufficient punishment for such a brainless, narcissistic oaf as Burt.