13 Weeks: Week 10 -- In Which We Scheme

First, David Steinberg, our New York City editor, is a certified CrossFit trainer. I've alluded to this before: the truth is that there's been a lot learned about the physiology of exercise in the last 20 years that often directly contradicts the common wisdom -- like the notion that you must perform hours of low-intensity aerobic exercise to improve cardiovascular fitness. CrossFit is an interesting bunch of techniques, and while I'm not sure I want to be forged into "elite fitness", the basic ideas of CrossFit are in line with the best new science on fitness: varied exercises; using what they call "functional movement", which means not building around isolation as a lot of weightlifting routines did in the past; and high intensity intervals. All of these are in line with what I'd been talking about before; this time I'll have a published routine for people to track me against, and some well-established metrics to track, like body fat. I also plan to include at least one Pilates lesson a week. Because I like Pilates. And Pilates studios full of dancers are a lot more fun than sweaty old gyms.

David and I will be pulling in some guest experts as well. So far, I've been working with my own reading; now we're calling in the heavy guns. Or the skinny guns. Something like that.

Second, on the mind-body side, hell, I live in Boulder. My old friend Nicky Lee is a neurolinguistic programming guru and expert hypnotherapist; I'll be working with her and her associate Jack Schaefer at Mountain West Wellness, using hypnotherapy, and perhaps Chinese medicine, and acupuncture. Don't know where that's going to go, but I've had a lot of success with hypnosis in the past, and Nicky has a lot of experience with the kind of issues I'm talking about. I don't know where that's going yet but it will certainly be interesting.

So stick with me; I think we've got lots of intriguing new things to learn.


Also follow Charlie's Buddhism writings on Sundays, here's the first installment:

Buddhism Is Not What You Think