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15 Pop Culture Artifacts We Can Thank Gen Xers For

Admittedly, as a Gen Xer I may be biased, but I believe that my generation has produced pop culture that outshines other generations' pop culture. To prove my claim, I've listed the fifteen best cultural artifacts produced by Gen X. I defy Baby Boomers and millennials to counter with a list of fifteen of their generation's offerings that bests my list.

Made up of pop culture that was either produced by a member of Gen X or that is indistinguishable from Gen X, the list includes albums, movies, TV shows, and books.

15. Friends

Whether you love or hate this uber-popular TV show, there is no denying that Friends is the quintessential sitcom. The fact that it remains among Netflix's most popular shows is a testament to Friends' pop culture relevance.

14. High Fidelity

 

(Image via Amazon)

The book, not the movie, although the movie starring John Cusack is great too. With his best-selling book, Nick Hornby may not have invented the "list," but High Fidelity definitely turned the making of lists into a cultural zeitgeist, ensuring that articles like the one you're reading will exist as long as Gen Xers are still around. The book also gave voice to Gen Xers' fear of commitment.

13. The Breakfast Club

Every Gen Xer knows that high school separates everyone into groups — the jock, the geek, the rebel, the rich/popular kid, or the loner. What The Breakfast Club taught us is that we are all more similar than we are different. That, and our real enemy is the principal.

12. Dazed and Confused

Not having gone to high school in the '70s, I can't comment on the historical accuracy of Richard Linklater's depiction of high schoolers in the mid-'70s, but I choose to believe that it's accurate. The interesting thing is that those of us who were still in high school or college when Dazed and Confused was released in 1993 felt that the kids at Lee High School were just like us.