November 29, 2016

THERE’S A LOT OF PROJECTION FROM THE LEFTIES HERE REGARDING OSTRACISM, A FAVORITE TACTIC OF THEIR OWN: Trump win is lesson for media and academia.

As the clock approached midnight on Election Day, our collective bubble began bursting and my iPhone began blowing up.

Myself included, members of my two professions, journalism and academia, were shell-shocked the presidential election didn’t go as expected.

“This is so f—ked up!” a journalist texted me.

“Oh my God!” pinged a professor. “We will be the ones ostracized if he wins.”

When Donald Trump’s victory was official, another academic acquaintance observed, “It’s an indictment on all of us.”

Indeed, it was an epic failure for the media-academia complex. Not just because nearly every poll showing that Trump had little to no chance of winning was a collaborative effort between media outlets and universities.

Journalists are supposed to inform the public about what’s happening in society. Professors are expected to prepare students for the real world. But this election, both were out of touch with reality. While some correctly predicted the outcome, most of us perished the thought. Our hubris may have even suppressed Hillary Clinton’s turnout and mobilized angry Trump supporters.

We need to reckon with our flaws, or risk becoming completely irrelevant in the political process. Here are some ways we can improve.

First, we must stop being insufferable know-it-alls. As scribes and scholars, we have expertise in a particular beat or field, but that doesn’t make us qualified to determine which candidate is best to lead 320 million Americans, each of whom has many and varied needs. Nor is it our job.

Now that kind of talk will get you ostracized in the media and universities.

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