December 3, 2015

IF YOU SEE SOMETHING…Man saw suspicious activity in Calif. but didn’t report it because of profiling concerns:

From CBS Los Angeles:

Neighbors in Redlands were shocked that the suspects had ties to their area.

“I was in awe that it was happening four houses down from my property,” one neighbor said.

A man who has been working in the area said he noticed a half-dozen Middle Eastern men in the area in recent weeks, but decided not to report anything since he did not wish to racially profile those people.

“We sat around lunch thinking, ‘What were they doing around the neighborhood?’” he said.  “We’d see them leave where they’re raiding the apartment.”

From last month: If you see something, say something. And get sued for $15 million.

And from Dorothy Rabinowitz of the Wall Street Journal on the tenth anniversary of 9/11:

A note about CNN’s “Footnotes of 9/11,” which takes up the subject of people who are mentioned in the “9/11 Commission Report.” They were part of the history of the day, if peripheral figures, though in one or two instances they emerge as more. One of the more memorable of the eight subjects here is the Dulles Airport ticket agent who checked in two of the hijackers—Middle Eastern men whose look and demeanor immediately raised his suspicions. The agent followed the men, he reports, then stopped himself from alerting anyone. He didn’t want to be accused of prejudice, of harboring suspicions because of racial feelings. A vignette from a footnote—but one that has much to tell about some of the underlying reasons for the ease with which the hijackers were able to board the planes and fulfill their murderous mission.

In her article, Rabinowitz also reviewed a Smithsonian Channel special called “9/11: Day That Changed The World.”  But in reality, very little has changed when it comes to the power of PC to stifle doubleplusungood crimethink.

 

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