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ISIS Warns of Knife Attack 'Surprises' at Concerts

Shortly after the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting that targeted an outdoor concert on the Las Vegas Strip, a pro-ISIS media group is circulating an online poster warning of knife attacks at musical events.

Previous releases from Remah Media Production included a January poster showing a jihadist standing in front of a cityscape vowing to "sink America" and another showing jihadists standing in front of a nondescript legislative building vowing that "soon you will taste agony." The group has also released video nasheeds, or songs to inspire terrorists.

In the new poster, a jihadist wearing a suit jacket stands with a large knife behind his back while behind concert-goers whose attention is fixed on the stage.

"Wait for our surprises," warns the text, signed "Islamic State."

In May 2017, a suicide bomber claimed by ISIS killed 22 people leaving an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena in the UK. Since the Oct. 1, 2017, massacre on a country music festival, ISIS has both claimed and idolized shooter Stephen Paddock, encouraging would-be terrorists to poach from his tactics such as how he used a sniper's perch in a suite on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay to kill 58 people and wound hundreds more.

Official ISIS media persisted for a few months in claiming responsibility for the massacre. ISIS featured an update on the shooting investigation in a mid-October issue of their al-Naba newsletter, referring to Paddock both by that name and the nom de guerre Abu Abdul Bar al-Amriki, which they bestowed upon the killer the day after the attack. The shooting "highlights the difficulties faced by U.S. cities to protect their own Crusader citizens from attacks that can take unpredictable forms," the newsletter said.