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Meet the New Willard, Same as the Old Willard

Having served some time in non-elected office purgatory, Willard Mitt Romney, Republican of Michigan Massachusetts New Hampshire California Utah, the man who blew the 2012 presidential election against a very beatable Barack Hussein Obama, is back in action:

Utah Republican Mitt Romney hasn’t yet been sworn in to the Senate, but he’s already flexing his fundraising muscle. The senator-elect is hosting a donor event Tuesday evening in Washington for Believe in America PAC, his newly-formed political action committee, according to an invitation obtained by POLITICO. The fundraiser will be the PAC’s first.

Romney, a former Massachusetts governor and the 2012 GOP presidential nominee, will be no ordinary freshman senator. He is expected to use his national profile and formidable fundraising network to collect chits and help elect Republicans across the country. Believe in America PAC and Team Mitt, a Romney-backed joint fundraising committee, were set up immediately after the Nov. 6 midterm election. Both vehicles can be used to send donations to GOP candidates.

Romney has made little secret that he intends to use his outsize profile as senator. Prior to the election, he backed an array of Republican candidates in races up and down the ballot.

The question is which GOP candidates Romney's PAC will back -- besides Mitt. Although Trump flirted with Romney when he was shopping for a secretary of state, there is little love lost between the two men and Romney's eyes might well be on the big prize in 2020 should he decide to mount a primary challenge to Trump. Of course, if he does, Romney will surely help deliver the White House to Bernie Sanders or Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez or Beto O'Rourke, whoever comes first.

But having delivered the Republican nomination in 2008 to John McCain, and the 2012 election to Obama, how would that be any different from what he's done in the past?