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Stretch, grab a late afternoon cup of caffeine and get caught up on the most important news of the day with our Coffee Break newsletter. These are the stories that will fill you in on the world that's spinning outside of your office window - at the moment that you get a chance to take a breath.
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Media Bias? What Media Bias?

If you subscribe, as I do, to the digital edition of the New York Times, you'll soon notice that just about every headline or subhed will contain some reference to President Trump. It almost doesn't matter what the ostensible subject of the article is; the hed must include some aside about "the age of Trump," even if the story is about golf or gardening. Because, you see, everything is political today. Naturally, this is especially true in the overtly political stories as well. For example, here's the run-up to something that happens every two years,  a nationwide congressional election:

Not the American Republic going to the polls to elect the entire House of Representatives, along with one-third of the Senate. No, "a nation in turmoil" preparing to "deliver a verdict" on Donald J. Trump, who's not even on the ballot.

Let's boldface the buzzwords!

The tumultuous 2018 midterm campaign, shaped by conflicts over race and identity and punctuated by tragedy, barreled through its final weekend as voters prepared to deliver a verdict on the first half of President Trump’s term, with Republicans bracing for losses in the House and state capitals but hopeful they would prevail in Senate races in areas where Mr. Trump is popular.

The president was set to storm across two states Saturday, two Sunday and three Monday in an effort to pick off Senate seats in Indiana, Florida and a handful of other battlegrounds where Republicans hope to add to their one-seat majority in the chamber. Democrats and liberal activists, galvanized by opposition to Mr. Trump, gathered Saturday to knock on doors and make turnout calls from Pennsylvania to Illinois to Washington to try to erase the G.O.P.’s 23-seat House majority.

The run-up to the election, widely seen as a referendum on Mr. Trump’s divisive persona and hard-line policy agenda, has revealed deep strains in the president’s political coalition and left him confined to campaign in a narrow band of conservative communities. Republicans’ intermittent focus on favorable economic news, such as the Friday report showing strong job growth, has been overwhelmed by Mr. Trump’s message of racially incendiary nationalism.

And that's just the first three paragraphs. Here's the fourth:

While Mr. Trump retains a strong grip on many red states and working-class white voters, his jeremiads against immigrants and penchant for ridicule have proved destabilizing, with the party losing  more affluent whites and moderates in metropolitan areas key to control of the House.

Here's the sixth:

In several diverse Sun Belt states where Republicans had shown resilience, such as Texas, Florida and Arizona, their candidates have seen their numbers dip in polling as Mr. Trump has given up the unifying role that American presidents have traditionally tried to play.