Election 2020

Poll: 38% of Trump Supporters Think Minorities Have 'Too Much' Influence

(AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

A new ABC News/Washington Post poll tracking racial attitudes among Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump supporters found more than a third of Trump supporters surveyed saying minorities have “too much” influence in society.

Half of Clinton backers say men have too much influence, while 20 percent of Trump supporters feel that way. Fifty-eight percent of Clinton supporters say women have too little influence, compared to 21 percent of Trump supporters.

Nine percent of Clinton supporters said minorities have too much influence in society, while 38 percent of Trump supporters said so.

Eight percent of Trump supporters said whites have too much influence, while 53 percent of Clinton backers said so.

Seven percent of Clinton supporters said whites have “too little” influence these days, while 21 percent of Trump voters agreed with that.

“Controlling for demographics, partisanship, ideology and presidential approval, seeing too little influence for whites and men and too much influence for minorities and women independently predicts support for Trump,” wrote Langer Research pollsters Gregory Holyk and Sofi Sinozich. “Other than disapproval of Barack Obama, which is by far the best predictor of support for Trump, views of group influence have a similar effect as partisanship, ideology and race.”

“Holding these pro-Trump views – that is, seeing too little influence for whites and men and too much influence for minorities and women – peaks among strong conservatives and core Trump supporters, those who wanted him to win the GOP presidential nomination. It’s also more prevalent among conservatives overall, people who disapprove of Obama’s job performance or feel they’ve gotten worse off financially under his presidency, men and older, less-educated and less well-off Americans,” the pollsters added.

“Conversely, the opinion that whites and men have too much influence, and minorities and women have too little, tops out among strong liberals and those who supported Bernie Sanders in the Democratic primary.”

Self-identified independents and moderates, “as they often do, fall in between.”