11-12-2018 02:03:24 PM -0800
11-12-2018 12:05:50 PM -0800
11-12-2018 07:27:30 AM -0800
11-12-2018 06:20:27 AM -0800
11-11-2018 04:20:12 PM -0800
It looks like you've previously blocked notifications. If you'd like to receive them, please update your browser permissions.
Desktop Notifications are  | 
Get instant alerts on your desktop.
Turn on desktop notifications?
Remind me later.
PJ Media encourages you to read our updated PRIVACY POLICY and COOKIE POLICY.
X


Death Wish VI: On the Turning Away

 

 

Ten years ago, Dan Henninger of the Wall Street Journal wrote that a then-recent issue of the Sunday Times "asked famous New Yorkers to identify New York's golden age. At least four identified the 1970s as the golden age:"

This is worth notice because in the 1970s banks said New York had spun its credit rating into dross and refused to lend more money to a city whose accumulated deficit reached $8 billion. Today its budget office reports that starting in FY2006, per-annum deficits for three years will be $3.7 billion, $4.5 billion and $3.7 billion. There is a mayoral election this November when we'll get the opinion of all New Yorkers on the city's current alchemists. But perhaps we should regard the famous Times' commentators yearning for the 1970s as canaries in the gold-plated mine shaft.

The actor John Leguizamo: New York in the '70s "was funky and gritty and showed the world how a metropolis could be dark and apocalyptic and yet fecund." Fran Lebowitz, a contributing editor for Vanity Fair: The city "was a wreck; it was going bankrupt. And it was pretty lawless; everything was illegal, but no laws were enforced. It was a city for city-dwellers, not tourists, the way it is now." Laurie Anderson, a well-known New York artist and performer, admits the '70s were considered "the dark ages" but "there was great music and everyone was broke."

* * * * * * * *

One of the better-known artifacts in the archaeology of New York is the movie "Death Wish." Released in 1974, it stars Charles Bronson as a Manhattan liberal who snaps under the burden of New York's violence and goes into the subways to mow down thugs the cops can't or won't catch. Back then the city's audiences cheered and screamed as Bronson smashed one civil-liberties platitude after another.

Peter Hall, in his magisterial study of history's great urban centers, "Cities in Civilization," remarks offhandedly that "not for nothing did New York develop so rapidly after the first subways . . . brought their trains into the center of Manhattan." The subways, of course, aren't for the tourists but for unwealthy city-dwellers. Starting in 1970, fires, collisions and derailments routinely wrecked New York's subways, injuring and even killing passengers. In August 1973, a chunk of concrete fell from the roof of the IRT Steinway tunnel and killed a passenger. A 1975 fire trapped 12,000 evening rush-hour passengers. But the cars were colorful. They were covered with graffiti, celebrated by Norman Mailer in a famously provocative paean to the graffiti painters.

The '70s golden-agers in the Times story don't deny what was going on then--but they kind of miss it. The photographer Mary Ellen Mark remembers "it was a time of costume and excitement, a time of youth and great energy." Caleb Carr, the novelist of old-time New York, thinks the city has been "sterilized by the Giuliani years." He says that "like a troublesome child taking Ritalin, New York may be more manageable now, but it has also sacrificed its personality."

These comments raise the question of just what liberalism believes makes a city great or even golden, rather than just . . . interesting.

As New York reverts back to the era of Bronson's Paul Kersey and DeNiro's Travis Bickle, we're all about to find out -- and not just Manhattan's SoHo bobo class, but its citizens who lead far less cossetted lives. As Heather Mac Donald noted this past week, "thousands of black men are alive today who would have been killed years ago had data-driven policing not brought down the homicide levels of the early 1990s."

And note that the left is having a meltdown over the NYPD turning their backs en masse on New York's tyro far left, radical chic-loving mayor. We've seen this panic before from Democrats and their operatives with bylines haven't we?

Why, yes we have.

Update:Oof: Bill de Blasio spurned by NYPD at Rafael Ramos funeral.