It’s a Wonderful Fountainhead

From now until December 25th (and perhaps January 1st), Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life will be playing somewhere. It's available on Blu-Ray. There's currently a sharp-looking copy on YouTube. It will be on TV, where the film's reputation was made during its many annual repeats; it was unexpectedly flat at the box office during its initial 1946 big screen run. And it will likely also be playing at a revival theater near you. My wife and I caught one such showing at the movie theater in San Jose's Santana Row yesterday, which was actually the first time I had seen it on the big screen, in a beautifully remastered digital version. It was a vivid reminder that as popular as It's a Wonderful Life is on TV, this was a film made to be seen by a large audience in a theater, and their knowing laughter during the film's best moments -- and likely, their weeping by the end of the film as we were -- adds immeasurably to its impact.

The film is now a double piece of nostalgia, something not intended by its makers. Certainly Capra and company viewed its initial flashback scenes to the early 20th century, the 1928 high school dance and the 1932-era bank run, as nostalgia. But the film's contemporary setting of post-World War II America is now almost 70 years in the rearview mirror, as are the morals of the people who made the film.

You certainly can get a sense of that merely from reading the film's Wikipedia page, when you come to the section on how the film is viewed by leftwing urban critics today, particularly the scenes set in "Pottersville," the segment in which small town Bedford Falls is transformed into Reno on the Hudson:

In a 2010 piece, Richard Cohen described It's a Wonderful Life as "the most terrifying Hollywood film ever made". In the "Pottersville" sequence, he wrote, George is not "seeing the world that would exist had he never been born", but rather "the world as it does exist, in his time and also in our own."] Nine years earlier, another Salon writer, Gary Kamiya, had expressed the opposing view that "Pottersville rocks!", adding, "The gauzy, Currier-and-Ives veil Capra drapes over Bedford Falls has prevented viewers from grasping what a tiresome and, frankly, toxic environment it is... We all live in Pottersville now."*

The film's elevation to the status of a beloved classic came decades after its initial release, when it became a television staple during Christmas season in the late 1970s. This came as a welcome surprise to Frank Capra and others involved with its production. "It's the damnedest thing I've ever seen," Capra told the Wall Street Journal in 1984. "The film has a life of its own now, and I can look at it like I had nothing to do with it. I'm like a parent whose kid grows up to be president. I'm proud... but it's the kid who did the work. I didn't even think of it as a Christmas story when I first ran across it. I just liked the idea."In a 1946 interview, Capra described the film's theme as "the individual's belief in himself" and that he made it "to combat a modern trend toward atheism".

Of course, atheism doesn't necessarily mean socialism -- even if that's how it invariably works out (more on that later); and after the page break, allow me to reprint my 2010 post titled "It's a Wonderful Fountainhead," which compares Capra's 1946 film with its very different contemporary, which was based on Ayn Rand's novel about a young man who dreams of going to the big city, becoming an architect and building giant phallic symbols, and, unlike George Bailey, who has to reconcile never leaving his small town, succeeds on his own terms. Followed by some further thoughts and links from 2013, and a jaw-dropping moment at Wikipedia.