Election Reflections

The Ultimate Rope-a-Dope

Needless to say, President Bush wasn't handled with the same kid gloves by the media.

The press threw everything they had at him. It seemed to begin in early February, when the gay marriage issue--egged on by the press with the hopes of discrediting a conservative president and even his wife--took center stage thanks to the Massachusetts Supreme Court. From there it was off to the races, including trumped up charges over Bush's 9/11-themed ads, the Abu Ghraib POW scandal; the partisan 9/11 hearing; and on and on.

Then throw in all the anti-war, anti-American, anti-Bush millionaire rock stars. And all of the anti-Bush books. And I think there was even an anti-Bush movie out during the summer. Maybe two. Or maybe more. Who can say?

By the time Halloween rolled around, it felt like daily October surprises: NYTrogate last Monday (and Tuesday, and Wednesday and...); Al Jazeera pulling Osama out of a hat on Friday, 60 Minutes' oldie-but-a-goodie body armor story on Sunday, and I think the Times had some sort of other anti-Bush story on Monday. (The bogus early returns Tuesday afternoon was the final October surprise. But that's a whole other post, as this one is going into extra innings.)

There were two distinct trends at work this year, egging each other on: the Bush team, has an almost Zen-like ability to simply not react no matter how much they're egged on by the leftwing legacy media. This has the result of absolutely infuriating that same leftwing legacy media into going even more nuts. It's the ultimate rope-a-dope: President Bush (along with his inner circle) endured blow after blow, hatred after hatred, attack after attack that would have crippled a weaker man, or caused him to lash back.

By not reacting, the media, the book publishers, the filmmakers grew increasingly more infuriated, and ratcheted up their hatred far, far, far past the red line on the hate-o-meter.

The result? They canceled much of their efforts out; the news media exposed its bias for the world to see (and oddly enough, in many cases discovered a new found--and frankly refreshing--willingness to admit that they're biased to the left); and for many, left themselves superfluous.

Which brings me back to where I started: almost as an experiment, I decided to keep the TV off on Tuesday and rely on the 'Net. The bloggers and Freepers kept me informed of everything I needed to know, and Hugh Hewitt provided a bias that fits comfortably with mine, while staying even-handed, cool and crisp throughout a long, crazed night.

Finally--Karl, we need to talk about royalty checks. Email me: I think you've lost my snail mail address or wire transfer information.