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Women's Magazines Dying? Good Riddance!

I read this article about women's magazines dying a (too slow) death and I say "good riddance." How much brainwashing have these paragons of social justice done to the women of America? Even magazines like Ladies' Home Journal are infested with left-leaning programming meant more for indoctrination than entertainment. From the article:

In late November, Glamour came to the same conclusion reached by so many other women's magazines these days: After 80 years in mailboxes and grocery store checkouts, it will stop publishing its glossy monthly, ending with the January issue. For Glamour, print is officially dead, the inexorable "pivot to digital" now complete.

Teen Vogue, a junior version of the fashion bible, was already there. Self, purveyor of 1,000 ways to say goodbye to your back fat, disappeared from the racks in 2017. Seventeen, once a lifestyle primer for high school girls everywhere, now will publish only special issues, and Redbook, one of the "seven sisters" of magazines for suburban housewives, is high-tailing it to the web as well.

The magazine industry as a whole has been belt-tightening for years thanks to a print advertising famine, eliminating costly paper copies while trying to establish a beachhead on the internet. Yet women's publications somehow feel much more endangered than the rest, especially now that even the woke online upstarts that once aimed to replace them - sites like the Hairpin, Rookie and the Toast - are themselves turning off the lights.

From Ladies' Home Journal (still hanging in there, but downgraded to a quarterly) to email-based Lenny Letter (extinguished this fall, after a wild three years), these publications helped mold tastes, define mainstream feminism (as well as femininity) and give talented female journalists a leg up into highflying media careers. Their demise feels like a loss - but is it?

Heck no, it's not. It's probably a win. Especially for those of us who are libertarian or right-leaning. Only Ladies' Home Journal, which is still lefty but less so than, say, Vogue, is hanging in there, but not for long. I wonder how many pro-freedom women have been chased away or are just bored by the constant left-leaning dogma?