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What are the Demographics of Psychologists?

Terry Brennan emailed out a link to the breakdown of women to men at the APA and states: "The zeitgeist is; men are bad, and only look out for themselves (or other men) and are hostile to women. As such, society needs to put women in charge of everything, as women will look out for everyone's best interest, and won't attack men."

"Well, the APA just put out guidelines attacking masculinity. So, what is the gender breakdown of the APA?"

Here they are:

This report focuses on the demographic changes of the nation's psychology workforce between 2007 and 2016, and serves as an update to the 2005-13: Demographics of the U.S. Psychology Workforce report by APA’s Center for Workforce Studies. The report is based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey, the most comprehensive sample available on the United States population.

Major findings include:

The psychology workforce has become younger in recent years. In the earlier part of the decade, the majority of the psychology workforce was made up of baby boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964). However, in recent years, the number of psychologists within the echo boomer generation (those born between 1976 and 2001) has surpassed those within the baby boomer generation. The mean age for psychologists remained relatively stable between 2007 (50.1 years) and 2014 (50.8 years). In 2015, however, there was a decrease in mean age to 48.9 years.

More young women have been entering the psychology workforce. The percent of psychologists who are women increased from 57 percent in 2007 to 65 percent in 2016. Within the psychology workforce, the mean age for women (47.6 years) was almost seven years younger than the mean age for men (54.4 years).

Men have been fleeing psychology for years and the only ones left are often male feminist Uncle Tim types who love to sell out their gender. The few decent men willing to get a PhD in psychology can look forward to a politically correct environment where the least slip of the tongue or politically incorrect research could be the end of a career. It's no wonder men stay away.