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For Men: Class Dismissed

If you ever wonder why fewer and fewer men are attending traditional colleges, just read this article at "Minding the Campus" that explains why men are boycotting these places in droves:

North American universities have been taken over by women. Men are decreasingly university students, professors, and administrators. “Gender equality,” a feminist war chant, apparently does not apply when females dominate.

In the United States, women outnumber men in colleges and universities — by 2026, the Department of Education estimates, 57 percent of college students will be women. In Canada, according to the “2001 Census, universities had clearly become the domain of women, as they made up 58% of all graduates. And according to the 2006 Census, women accounted for 60% of university graduates between the ages of 25 and 29.” Women also dominate in British universities. The same imbalance is seen in universities around the world....

Men are equally left out in Britain. James Knight was the only candidate to [send] his name forward to be men’s officer at the University of the West of England, and said he wanted to highlight male mental health issues. However, the National Union of Students officers began a campaign against the role, and he pulled out after claiming he [was] harassed. The university said the post was suspended pending review.”

The shift from male to female dominance in education, which correlates with the modern feminist movement, is not only demographic but also ideological. Feminists have not only advocated benefitting females but have also actively worked to disadvantage males, as the examples above illustrate. Men are deemed unruly, dangerous, and “toxic” by feminists, who feel “unsafe” around males. The loss of interest in education by males in the West is at least in part due to being discouraged and demeaned by feminist teachers and administrators. Designing education to engage both boys and girls is not seen by feminists as desirable. Thus, given the feminist disregard of the rights and interests of the “other” male half of the population, it is clear that it is feminism that is “toxic.”

I thought about this article as I read a new book by Nick Adams called Class Dismissed: Why College Isn't the Answer that highlights the problems with colleges, particularly for men, and gives useful advice and alternative career paths for students to pursue:

You’re just about to graduate high school. Your parents, your friends, your teachers, and society all tell you that the next step is college, that without higher education, you won’t be able to get a quality job, you’ll struggle to pay your bills, and you’ll fail.

They're wrong.

But for millions of young Americans, college is not the answer. What about the teenager for whom sitting in a classroom is unfulfilling and frustrating? What about the kid with a skillset that can’t be nurtured on campus?

In Class Dismissed: Why College Isn’t the Answer, Nick Adams explains how you can achieve the American Dream without receiving a traditional education. An essential tool for parents and grandparents, this book discusses how families can recognize whether their child will get more from a trade school or a mentorship than they will from four years of study.

In a warm, engaging, and often humorous fashion, Adams will inspire individuals who want to march into their professional life with a sense of empowerment that can only be attained by recognizing and doing what’s right for you.

The author gives many examples of both successful people who did not attend college and careers paths such as paralegal, X-ray technician, criminal justice and real estate agent and entrepreneur that require trade school or training. My only real problem with the book is that it makes it sound easier to get one of the good positions than it is. Sure, you can work in real estate but it's tough to make a good living and training for criminal justice often involves a lot of school. And most people are not billionaire Paul Allen or Brad Pitt, who did not finish college.

That said, it's an excellent book to get your son or grandson if you think he would prefer an alternative path than traditional college. You just might save him a lot of misery and indoctrination.