The Value of Mentoring

I just read a good book on mentoring called One Minute Mentoring: How to Find and Work With a Mentor--And Why You'll Benefit from Being One. The book gives tips on how to be a good mentor and how to find a good mentor:

While most people agree that having a mentor is a good thing, they don’t know how to find one or use one. And despite widespread approval for the idea of being a mentor, most people don’t think they have the time or skills to do so.

Positive mentoring relationships can change the way we lead and help us succeed. In One Minute Mentoring, legendary management guru Ken Blanchard and Claire Diaz-Ortiz, a former Twitter executive and early employee, combine their knowledge to provide a systematic approach to intergenerational mentoring, giving readers great insight into the power and influence of mentoring and encouraging them to pursue their own mentoring relationships.

I was helped by a mentor early in my career and I will never forget how much the relationship helped me to grow in my work and as a person. I wrote about my mentor when I first started blogging years ago:

A sound philosophy of life, I think, may be the most valuable asset for a psychiatrist to have when he is treating a patient. -- Victor Frankl

Did you ever have a mentor--either a personal or professional one who guided you through the intricacies of life and work? I had a terrific mentor when I was in my early twenties who not only helped me learn to do my job well but taught me how to live my life well. His name was Dr. Fred Wisner and his office was on Central Park West next to the Dakota building where John Lennon was shot. Every week when I would go to see Dr.Wisner for our weekly supervision sessions, I would pass by the area where Lennon was killed and think about the reasons that a madman like Mark Chapman would kill Lennon in the first place.

You can read the rest of the post here.

Did readers here at PJM ever have a mentor and if so, what did you learn, if anything, from him or her?