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Simon Constable is an economics and markets commentator. He has written for The Wall Street Journal, Barron's, US News & World Report, and Forbes, as well as many other well-known publications. He co-authored "The WSJ Guide to the 50 Economic Indicators that Really Matter," an economics category winner in the Small Business Book Awards at Small Business Trends. Constable also is a fellow at the Johns Hopkins Institute for Applied Economics, Global Health and the Study of Business Enterprise.

WRITTEN BY Simon Constable
Trying to clip together the events and the causality is tricky, especially in this case, because the financial industry job losses coincide with gains in the British economy, which keeps getting better.
The report’s authors don't point to stress over navigating the insurance marketplace, but something that economists call “moral hazard.”
In other words, addicts get drawn toward whatever drugs are available. If some types of illicit drugs aren’t an option, then the junkies gravitate toward what they can purchase.
The new economy is boosting the blue areas of the country but not the red ones, which still rely heavily on traditional manufacturing or agriculture.