While Hezbollah Arms, UN Peacekeepers in Lebanon Teach Yoga and Knitting

The news is full of reports that Israeli air strikes have targeted Iranian-supplied missiles in Syria, which Israeli officials believe were intended for Hezbollah -- Iran's satellite terrorist organization in Lebanon. Midway through a New York Times story on this development comes a reminder that :

Hezbollah is now believed to have more missiles and fighters than it had before its 2006 battle with Israel, when Hezbollah missiles forced a third of Israel's population into shelters and hit as far south as Haifa.

"More missiles" may be putting it modestly. In 2011, Israeli authorities said that Hezbollah had rearmed to the extent of amassing more than three times the weapons it had prior to the 2006 war. Supplementing their allegations with detailed maps, Israeli officials charged that Hezbollah had created a network across southern Lebanon of almost 1,000 rocket and missile facilities, including 550 bunkers and 100 weapons storage units.

All of which raises the question of what's going on with the UN peacekeeping force in southern Lebanon, known as UNIFIL (UN Interim Force in Lebanon). UNIFIL was beefed up, at significant cost, after the 2006 war, with the professed aim of ensuring that Hezbollah would not rearm. As spelled out in 2006 in UN Security Council Resolution 1701, which was supposed to secure peace, UNIFIL's mandate included helping Lebanon's armed forces ensure that southern Lebanon, bordering on Israel, would be -- to quote from the UNIFIL web site -- "an area free of any armed personnel, assets and weapons other than those of the government of Lebanon and of UNIFIL deployed in the area."

Obviously -- see the information above -- that mandate for ensuring an area free of Hezbollah munitions has not worked out. So what is UNIFIL doing?