Uh Oh. How Is Hillary Going to Explain Throwing Bill Under the Bus?

Hillary Clinton is very unhappy about Indiana's new Religious Freedom Restoration Act and on Thursday, she joined in the histrionics of the angry mobs who were complaining about the horrid, discriminatory law.

 

 

But Sean Davis, co-founder of The Federalist, pointed out that it was Hillary's husband, then-President Clinton, who signed the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act in 1993.

 

 

Davis then noted a whole litany of Bill Clinton policies that Hillary Clinton apparently finds problematic.

 

 

Just to set the record straight on Indiana's RFRA, despite Hillary's hysterics and the shrieks of the mobs calling for a boycott of the entire state (but not the other 30 states that have religious liberty protections), the new law does not actually discriminate against anyone. There's not one word in the legislation that enshrines discrimination into Indiana law.

Gov. Mike Pence defended the RFRA in a statement after he signed it into law:

This bill is not about discrimination, and if I thought it legalized discrimination in any way in Indiana, I would have vetoed it. In fact, it does not even apply to disputes between private parties unless government action is involved. For more than twenty years, the federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act has never undermined our nation’s anti-discrimination laws, and it will not in Indiana.

The RFRA simply provides that state or local governments may not "substantially burden" a person's right to exercise his religion unless there is a "compelling governmental interest" and the government must use the "least restrictive means" to further that interest. It also provides that a person who believes his religious liberty has been violated by a state or local government action may raise that as a claim or a defense in a judicial proceeding. It doesn't say who would prevail in that proceeding, only that the individual can have his day in court.