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University of Chicago Students Call On Anti-Israel Prof Mearsheimer to Retire

But Mearsheimer continued to teach, attend faculty meetings, and be treated with civility by his colleagues, both at the University of Chicago and beyond, where he became an ever more popular guest lecturer. Far from "paying a price," he and his co-author have flourished as they never had before. Although his colleagues said nothing, Mearsheimer's students were taking note of his public descent into classic bigotry, freely and widely expressing his heretofore unspoken beliefs. The students exquisitely analyze their teacher's tragic fall, and conclude as follows:

Professor Mearsheimer’s contribution to the study of powers regional and global will last, may even become canonical, but he has in recent years attracted a very sorry stain upon himself, his scholarship, and the University which enabled his many achievements. The charge of anti-Semitism is a durable one, especially when actions repeatedly fail to contradict it. Professor Mearsheimer is certainly entitled to study, author, and speak whatever he will (we do not think the approval of hateful ideas a fireable offense), but it will refract upon an institution that has done more for him than he has done for it. It lately refracts the most bigoted ravings of a British madman and the questionable animus of his endorsing professor. If Professor Mearsheimer is to retain any of the grace of an accomplished scholar and do right by his home for nearly thirty years, there is but a single option: retirement.

The publication of this editorial, which I urge all PJ Media readers to read in its brilliant entirety here, inspired alumni who had been Mearsheimer's students to publish their own views favoring Mearsheimer's resignation, such as this luminous post by Pejman Yousefzadeh, now an attorney in Chicago who studied both as an undergraduate in political science and a graduate student in international relations with Mearsheimer.

One cannot improve on the students’ own conclusion: retirement is the only way Mearsheimer can possibly save the few tattered shreds that remain of his reputation.