U.S. Evacuates Tripoli Embassy Personnel by Land to Tunisia

The Defense Department was called in to evacuate all staff from the U.S. Embassy in Tripoli in what the State Department called a "temporary staff relocation" to Tunis.

Pentagon press secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby said "at the request of the Department of State, the U.S. military assisted in the relocation of personnel from the U.S. Embassy in Tripoli" today. There were reportedly 150 staff there including 80 Marines.

"All embassy personnel were relocated, including the Marine security guards who were providing security at the embassy and during the movement," Kirby said. "The embassy staff was driven in vehicles to Tunisia."

"During movement, F-16's, ISR assets and an Airborne Response Force with MV-22 Ospreys provided security. The mission was conducted without incident, and the entire operation lasted approximately five hours."

State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf said the U.S. is "grateful to the Government of Tunisia for its cooperation and support" and that the staff would travel "onward" from there.

"Due to the ongoing violence resulting from clashes between Libyan militias in the immediate vicinity of the U.S. Embassy in Tripoli, we have temporarily relocated all of our personnel out of Libya," Harf said in a statement this morning. "We are committed to supporting the Libyan people during this challenging time, and are currently exploring options for a permanent return to Tripoli as soon as the security situation on the ground improves. In the interim, staff will operate from Washington and other posts in the region."

"Securing our facilities and ensuring the safety of our personnel are top Department priorities, and we did not make this decision lightly. Security has to come first. Regrettably, we had to take this step because the location of our embassy is in very close proximity to intense fighting and ongoing violence between armed Libyan factions," she continued.

"We will continue to engage all Libyans and the international community to seek a peaceful resolution to the current conflict and to advance Libya’s democratic transition. We reiterate that Libyans must immediately cease hostilities and begin negotiations to resolve their grievances. We join the international community in calling on all Libyans to respect the will of the people, including the authority of the recently-elected Council of Representatives, and to reject the use of violence to affect political processes. Many brave Libyans sacrificed to advance their country toward a more secure and prosperous future. We continue to stand solidly by the Libyan people as they endeavor to do so."

Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee Buck McKeon simply said “as Americans evacuate from Tripoli, I want to express my deep gratitude for the U.S. forces who have been on standby alert there."

"My thoughts and prayers are with all Americans in Libya," McKeon added. "I wish them a safe return, and for the safety of American troops watching over them."

Libyan airspace has largely been closed due to the violence. The Libya Herald reported that Libyan Airlines planes were being hit on the tarmac in missile attacks on Tripoli International Airport.

A Maltese oil worker was abducted in recent days and Turkey told all of its citizens to leave the country.

The ongoing violence threatens to derail a meeting of Libya's House of Representatives planned in Benghazi on Aug. 4.