'Known Wolf' Syndrome: Sydney Hostage-Taker Is Yet Another Case

With the hostage situation resolved -- hopefully with no innocent lives lost (reports just coming in - UPDATE: Reports say that one hostage as well as the gunman are dead) -- and the release of the name of the hostage taker, Iranian-born Islamic cleric Man Monis aka Shiekh Haron, this seems to be yet another case of what I termed here at PJ Media several weeks ago as "Known Wolf Syndrome."

In that article, following two separate terror attacks in Canada in which the suspects were already well-known to authorities, I noted that in the U.S., too, in many of the domestic terrorism cases the culprits had already been identified to law enforcement as problems. In the present case, not only was the suspect well-known, but he was out on bail on murder charges related to the stabbing and setting on fire of his ex-wife, with whom he was in a heated custody dispute.

Monis came to Australia in 1996 from Iran and his immigration status was that of political refugee. He has since had other well-known run-ins with law enforcement. In 2009, he sent a series of hate messages, which he deemed as "flowers of advice," to the families of Australian military members who had been killed in action. He likened their deaths to the deaths of Hitler's soldiers, as well as to families of Australian victims of international terrorism attacks. He was given 300 hours of community service.

In another case, Monis was charged with 50 counts of sexual assault, where it was claimed that he lured victims in and assaulted them claiming it was a "spiritual healing technique."

We'll undoubtedly learn more in the days to come about the intentions and motives of the suspect in the case. The evidence at hand clearly indicates that Monis was another example of the two-faced Islamic cleric. In this case, Monis claimed that he was "an Australian who wanted a safe future for our country" (HT: Stewart Bell) while simultaneously -- and openly -- hating the very country that gave him refuge.

Yet again, we have a case in the West in which a domestic terrorist was well-known to law enforcement authorities and yet action sufficient to prevent the tragedy at hand was never taken despite the opportunity to do so (in this instance, he was out on bail).

Nonetheless, this will be yet another case where so-called terrorism "experts" will be trotted out by the media and political officials to claim that Monis was a case of "lone wolf syndrome." Or that his actions were entirely unpredictable, and the government will need more money for terrorism programs that won't work, and for outreach to the very extremists who continue to murder, rape, and maim innocents. And the "voxsplaining" has begun, distancing the suspect from any known extremist group.