Sarah Silverman Apologizes for Fake Story...Sort Of...Then Doubles-Down on Fake Story

Sarah Silverman Sarah Silverman may not think the "wage gap" for women is funny, but her false personal victimization story, and today's inaccurate, impersonal apology is a howler.

In an exclusive to Salon.com, comic Sarah Silverman has apologized -- sort of -- to former New York Comedy Club owner Al Martin for naming and shaming him in a video meant to advance the cause of equal pay for women.

And while she acknowledges that her story about being cheated out of equal pay had nothing to do with sexism, equal pay or cheating, she indicates that that was not her main mistake.

SILVERMAN: My regret is that I mentioned Al [Martin] by name- it should have been a nameless, faceless anecdote and he has always been lovely to me.

In other words, the false story itself was fine, but it would have been a better without identifying details that a nosy reporter could verify or discredit, as I did here, with a follow-up here.

SILVERMAN: This is also HARDLY an example of the wage gap and can only do that very true reality a terrible disservice if I were trying to make it one.  When I was interviewed by Levo, they asked me “Do you remember a time you were paid less for the same job” and this story, being just that, popped into my head.   To Al, I truly am sorry to bring you into this as you employ women and pay them the same as the men I’m sure.

While she offers this public written online apology to Martin, as of 2:40 p.m. (EDT) on Tuesday, she had not contacted him personally. But notice that we can be sure the "wage gap" issue is legit, despite her false story, because she calls it a "very true reality."

But that's not the end of her story telling. In her public "apology" Silverman offers a new account of that night in 2002. Today (Tuesday), I asked Al Martin about the shifting story. Turns out that Silverman's new account is no more accurate than her old one, even as details change.

SILVERMAN: I didn’t expect to get paid, that’s not why I was there, but when I got off stage Al, the sweet club owner, paid me 10 bucks and I signed the payment sheet. I was like, oh, nice. I inferred from that that this was a paid spot not a guest spot.  Either way I would have been fine.

Martin says he didn't pay Silverman anything when she got off the stage, as is the custom with guest spots. He gave her $10 cab fare only after she came back inside the club to complain that Todd Barry was paid and she was not. The tale continues...

SILVERMAN: Then when Todd pointed out that he received 60 dollars for the same spot I went back inside and asked Al why Todd got sixty dollars and I got ten. That’s when he certainly could have said “Because it was a guest spot, Sarah.  I was just being super nice and gave you ten dollars for cab money.”

Actually, Martin stands behind his original version: He did tell her it was a guest spot when she complained, and then gave her $10, but openly admits he was not "super nice." He just wanted the conflict to end.

SILVERMAN: But instead, (and I will always remember this exactly how he said it because it was unbelievably hilarious) he said, “Oh- did you want a $60 spot?”

Martin flatly denies this: "I never said the $60 line."

Despite the inaccuracies, Al Martin said Silverman's apology is adequate. The married father of three daughters has previously noted that he agrees with the equal pay for women cause and conducts his business accordingly.

One final note of insincerity: Sarah Silverman's apology comes with this proviso.

To the maniacs who want to use this as a chit against women’s issues, I ask that you please don’t.  Because that would be super shitty. Feel free to aim your vitriol at me but leave this issue of working women out of it, K?

And that's the moment where the alleged "apology" turns into an attack against "the maniacs" -- Silverman's term of endearment for those who disagree with her. Despite their anti-woman stand, however, she does ask "the maniacs" nicely: "please don't."

To sum up, let's follow the Leftist logic.

1) Silverman was recruited because her notoriety might help the cause.

2) She fabricated a story to identify with the cause, and ostensibly with its female victims.

3) She is unmasked as a liar, and now wants you to disassociate her from the cause to which her notoriety and personal identification brought more than 166,000 viewers.

4) If you insist on disagreeing with the cause, you're a "maniac."