Sarah Palin and the Sham of Feminism

John McCain's selection of Alaska Governor Sarah Palin as his running mate has energized the right. Conservatives view her as one of their own and are enthralled by her life story. She is a Washington outsider who, unlike the Democratic presidential nominee, impresses as being sincere, fresh, and new. Moreover, in juxtaposition with both Barack Obama and Joe Biden, her deeds suggest that she is an actual reformer rather than a person whose change message is wholly rhetorical. Her acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention was a testament to her savvy and appeal. Palin's inspired talk yielded two of the best lines ever spoken about Barack Obama: "I guess a small-town mayor is sort of like a ‘community organizer,' except that you have actual responsibilities," and "The American presidency is not supposed to be a journey of ‘personal discovery.'"

The Republican ticket offers the electorate two politicians who possess the courage to act on their convictions, which is something that could never (honestly) be said about the flagships of the left that oppose them; although, to what extent Palin will assist McCain in attracting female voters is a question in open dispute. Hillary Clinton made history this year -- garnering 18 million votes and nearly pulling off the comeback of this new century -- so one would presuppose that the emergence of "Sarah Barracuda" offered a bit of redemption for those feminists embittered by the results of the Democratic primaries.

Yet such an assumption would be incorrect. A working knowledge of feminism and the fashion by which the original meaning of the word has been irreversibly traduced by radicalism told observers all they needed to know about the stance acolytes would take in regard to Palin. Those of us for whom feminists are deplorably familiar have known for years that the primary reason for their success is their keeping up the pretense that they are "women's groups" who advance "women's rights." However, both of these contentions are wrong. Big Feminism promotes statism, political correctness, misandry, contempt for our country, anti-Caucasian racism, and a host of other evils.

Unsurprisingly, the response of feminist activists and their peers in the mainstream media to the news of Sarah Palin's nomination was immediate. Their disdain was palpable and their maliciousness readily evident. Peter Hitchens' prediction proved prescient: "Watch as the ultra-feminist sisterhood back away in horror from Sarah Palin, John McCain's new running mate. Mrs. Palin is technically female, but she's enthusiastically married, hates abortion, and thinks criminals should not be the only people allowed to own guns. She's everything Hillary Clinton isn't. In short, she's the wrong kind of woman."

Indeed, that she is.