Regulatory Tyranny Flies Under the Radar

Van Susteren interviewed CEO Brent Southwell of Professional Janitorial Service, whose company has over 1,000 employees. Despite no employee-initiated complaints and "26 years without a single OSHA write-up," Southwell disclosed that OSHA had recently visited him three separate times, in each instance accompanied by a representative of the Service Employees International Union. How oddly coincidental it is that PJS "is currently suing SEIU for $9 million" for alleged slander.

These actions, all of which appear to be inevitable and/or unstoppable, make a mockery of the administration's oft-professed interest in economic growth. The prediction of a former NLRB chairman about its new "can't relocate" rule really applies to all three DOL moves: They "will hasten those companies' demise and harm the economy."

Why would any sane person run a company or hire any or more employees in this hostile environment? A partial answer that question is that fewer Americans are choosing to start up new businesses, and those who do are deciding not to put anyone besides their founders on the payroll. The small firm start-up rate in recent years has been miles below where it was in the 1980s, and employment growth at such firms has been painfully slow.

Another online site recently noted that if its budget was seen as a separate economy, the federal government would be the third-largest in the world. Of course, the problem with seeing Uncle Sam's enterprise as an economy is that it produces very little of value beyond providing national security, which is naturally where this administration is cutting military and diplomatic corners. Despite the Keynesians' claims, sending out $2 trillion in entitlement checks per year is not an economy-advancing enterprise.

In such a vast organization, it's not unreasonable to believe that a great deal of despotic behavior is going undetected. To cite just one accidentally discovered example, who would have known about EPA Regional Administrator Al Armendariz's preemptive, evidence-free war on fracking if he hadn't been caught on tape in 2012 telling an audience of coworkers that his regulatory philosophy was to "crucify" and "make examples of" alleged environmental offenders?

Unfortunately, too many on the right who should be monitoring internal developments and screaming when abuses are found, especially in Congress, have shown that they're more interested in reelection and building their coffers than in the blocking and tackling inherent in their assigned oversight roles.

Thus, while only suffering minor setbacks from time to time, the regulatory tyranny advances.