Reaction Inside DOJ to Debo Adegbile Defeat: 'Sacred Mission' Continues

What is the reaction inside DOJ to the Senate's defeat of the Debo Adegbile nomination to head the Civil Rights Division at the Department of Justice? According to an email sent by Acting Assistant Attorney General Jocelyn Samuels, the "sacred mission" will continue.

Samuels, in an email late this afternoon to Division staff obtained by PJ Media, said:

I anticipate that last week's developments will prompt a period of reflection and discussion about civil rights in this country and how we can best achieve our sacred mission. This is healthy, and I am confident that our work will emerge the stronger for it. Division staff have always demonstrated both resilience and an enduring commitment to the principles of equality of opportunity that animate everything we do.

"Sacred mission"? "Equality of opportunity"?


First, Webster has a number of theological definitions of sacred:

1 a : dedicated or set apart for the service or worship of a deity <a tree sacred to the gods>

b: devoted exclusively to one service or use (as of a person or purpose) <a fund sacred to charity>


a : worthy of religious veneration : holy

b : entitled to reverence and respect


: of or relating to religion : not secular or profane <sacred music>

This illustrates that to some in the civil rights field, civil rights is their religion. Thus, it becomes sacred.

Regarding the Debo Adegbile nomination, one of the reasons Adegbile lost is because he did not believe in equality of opportunity. He believed in giving out benefits based on race. That's why he fought to keep Abigail Fisher out of law school simply because she was white. Fisher was not the only victim of the NAACP's modern-day segregationist agenda, and senators knew it.

Fifty years ago, the NAACP LDF had the moral high ground and fought inequality. In 2014, the NAACP is one of the leading champions of inequality.

So let's have that discussion about race that Samuels and Senator Harry Reid have been agitating for. Bring it on.

After regular Americans in Peoria learn that the Civil Rights Division supports race preferences and hasn't done a thing to combat numerous instances of racially motivated violence, I suspect it will be a discussion Samuels and Reid hope ends quickly. Once regular Americans learn about the millions of dollars used by the DOJ to block voter ID and to allocate benefits on the basis of skin color, it will be a discussion Samuels, Reid, and Obama wish had never started.

It will be a discussion that will have ramifications in races for the U.S. Senate in places like North Carolina, Louisiana, Arkansas and West Virginia.

Right now leftist racialists are in the tiny minority in America. Once we start that racial discussion Reid is agitating for, you can bet the majority won't be happy to learn what the sacred mission at the DOJ Civil Rights Division is all about.

Also read: Progressive Racism: The Hidden Motive Driving Modern Politics