Porn Stars Panicked by California Health Record Subpoenas

Two of California’s hottest porn stars, James Deen and Jessica Drake, released a satirical video in 2012 warning that efforts to force people having sex on camera to wear condoms could result, worst case, in men and women wearing goggles and safety helmets in bed or wherever the script called for them to copulate.

They shot too low.

James and Jessica should have done a video in which court workers are seen hauling boxes of medical records out of the clinics where porn stars get tested for sexually transmitted infections and diseases.

It is not like they didn’t have enough to worry about. California’s hottest porn stars and studio executives have been riddled with anxiety over the possible approval of statewide legislation to force performers to wear condoms while having sex in front of the camera.

Now, California’s pornographers have a new concern: medical privacy.

Their XXX-rated world started caving in like a broken umbrella in November 2012 when Los Angeles voters approved Measure B, which required porn actors to wear condoms.

Porn studio executives were also hit by the ballot proposition. It forced them to pay an annual fee to the Los Angeles County Health Department because what was happening on studio beds, sofas, and any other prop where two people could get horizontal was considered to be such a health risk.

While some female porn stars welcomed the condom law in L.A., male porn performers argued that being forced to wear condoms was more than a violation of their rights. They said wearing a condom can actually hurt when it and the appendage it’s on are subjected to the kind of workout required in XXX-rated movies.

Men paid to perform in porn have complained of microtearing, yeast infections, friction burns, and condoms that break because of the unusual stress from sexual activity in a pornographic setting.

Porn industry executives said they are successfully policing themselves in California with a bi-weekly, voluntary testing policy for everyone who has sex in one of their flicks. They argue that’s as good as a condom.

The porn industry spent millions to try to get Measure B overturned in court. Their efforts failed.

Ever since the AIDS Healthcare Foundation led the drive to win public approval of Measure B in Los Angeles, the organization has been relentless in its quest to crack down on what is known as “bareback” sex.

The AIDS Healthcare Foundation has taken its drive to put a condom on every male porn star to California voters. Leaders of the effort announced in July they had collected enough signatures to get a proposal that would have a broader impact than Measure B on the California ballot in November 2016.

Fine. Even more money for the lawyers. But now the porn industry has this new worry, thanks again to the AIDS Healthcare Foundation. Porn studio executives and their stars are being forced to open their medical records.