Pentagon Official: Airstrikes 'Unlikely to Affect ISIL's Overall Capabilities'

An official with the Joint Chiefs of Staff told reporters at the Pentagon today that U.S. airstrikes "have slowed ISIL's operational tempo and temporarily disrupted their advances toward the province of Erbil" and Kurdish forces are holding territory near the imperiled city.

"However, these strikes are unlikely to affect ISIL's overall capabilities or its operations in other areas of Iraq and Syria," cautioned Lt. Gen. Bill Mayville, director of operations.

"ISIL remains focused on securing and gaining additional territory throughout Iraq and will sustain its attacks against Iraqi and Kurdish security forces and their positions, as well as target Yazidis, Christians, and other minorities," Mayville said. "Our current operations are limited in scope to protect U.S. citizens and facilities, to protect U.S. aircraft supporting humanitarian assistance, and to assist in the breakup of ISIL forces that have laid siege to the Sinjar Mountain."

That assistance has included "14 successful missions" over the past four nights between the US and UK "airdropping more than 310 bundles of food, water, and medical supplies, delivering almost 16,000 gallons of water and 75,000 meals."

"To date, U.S. Air Force and Navy aircraft, to include F-15Es, F-16s, F/A-18s, and MQ-1s have executed 15 targeted airstrikes," Mayville said, and "over 60 intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft are supporting our coalition efforts."

He stressed that there are "no plans to expand the current air campaign beyond the current self- defense activities," even though Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel today called the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL or ISIS) "a threat to the civilized world."

"As for what we might do next, we'll have to wait and see and get a better assessment on the ground before we can offer some options to the president," Mayville said.

"We are, right now, gripped by the immediacy of the crisis. And our focus right now is to provide immediate relief to those that are suffering. We are looking at the effect that we're having on those fixed sites, those ISIL sites, those ISIL sites that are laying siege, and we are trying to reduce that threat. And for the near term, that's going to be our focus."

Mayville stressed that "in the immediate areas where we have focused our strikes, we've had a very temporary effect."

"What I expect the ISIL to do is to look for other things to do, to pick up and move elsewhere. So I in no way want to suggest that we have effectively contained or that we are somehow breaking the momentum of the threat posed by ISIL... The targeting in this is going to become more difficult."

The Joint Chiefs ops director said he remains "very concerned about the threat posed by ISIL in Iraq and in the region."

"They're very well-organized. They are very well-equipped. They coordinate their operations. And they have thus far shown the ability to attack on multiple axes. This is not insignificant," Mayville continued.

"What happened last week was that Iraqi security forces simply did not have the equipment and the supplies and the ammunition to sustain their defensive positions around the Mosul Dam and in and around Mount Sinjar. And it is for that reason that the ISIL forces were as effective as they were."