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Oh, That War on Cops

Being conscientious and diligent cops, they chose the second option, bringing themselves into contact with one Mr. Parta Huff of Maywood, Illinois. Unknown to the officers was the fact that earlier on that same day, Huff had appeared in court to answer to a charge that he assaulted a police officer in nearby Forest Park last April.  In that incident, an officer saw Huff run a stop sign and attempted to pull him over. Huff drove off but crashed the car and tried to run away. The officer was injured in the altercation that followed.

But again, the Chicago officers were unaware of this history when they tried to contact Huff. And they were also unaware (though it would soon become apparent) that Huff was under the influence of PCP. In the ensuing struggle, three officers were hurt, with the female officer described above suffering a concussion, among other injuries. A firefighter who responded to treat the officer was captured on a police body camera saying, “A couple months ago, you could have shot him,”

The firefighter’s time frame might have been understated by a year or two, but the point remains. Had that officer shot Huff so as to prevent him from bashing her head into the pavement, the headlines would have read, “Cop shoots unarmed black man,” and the drill would have played out in familiar fashion, with protesters shutting down Michigan Avenue and politicians scrambling to avoid “controversy” by disavowing the officer’s act of self-defense. While the laws governing police use of force has gone all but unchanged since the Supreme Court’s Graham v. Connor decision in 1989, much else is different, thanks in no small part to the continuing fraud perpetrated by the Black Lives Matter movement and its fawning sympathizers in the media and its cowardly servants in government.

And if it weren’t bad enough that BLM’s lies have so influenced people outside law enforcement, we now see their effect on people who presumably should know better. On Monday, at the San Diego meeting of the International Association of Police Chiefs, the group’s president, Chief Terrence Cunningham, of the Wellesley, Mass., Police Department, issued an apology “for the actions of the past and the role that our profession has played in society’s historical mistreatment of communities of color.” Putting aside the noxious concept of inherited guilt, in delivering his apology, Cunningham illustrated the divide between so-called police executives and the rank-and-file officers they purport to lead.

The president of one of the largest police organizations in the United States on Monday, OCT. 17, 2016, apologized for historical mistreatment of minorities, calling it a "dark side of our shared history" that must be acknowledged and overcome. Terrence Cunningham, president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, said at the group's annual conference that police have historically been a face of oppression, enforcing laws that ensured legalized discrimination and denial of basic rights. He was not more specific. (AP Photo/Elliot Spagat) The president of one of the largest police organizations in the United States on Monday, OCT. 17, 2016, apologized for historical mistreatment of minorities, calling it a "dark side of our shared history" that must be acknowledged and overcome. Terrence Cunningham, president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, said at the group's annual conference that police have historically been a face of oppression, enforcing laws that ensured legalized discrimination and denial of basic rights. He was not more specific. (AP Photo and caption/Elliot Spagat)

People rise in their respective police departments to the extent they can (or convincingly pretend to) adopt the political views that dominate their local governments, and Chief Cunningham would seem a perfect fit for Wellesley, a prosperous suburb of Boston. A few facts about the town: The black population is 2 percent; the median income in 2014 was $159,615; 82.2 percent of residents over age 25 have at least a bachelor’s degree and 48.5 percent have graduate degrees; and in 2012 the town voted 56 to 41 percent for Obama over Romney. When it comes to crime, the town hasn’t seen a murder in at least 14 years and averages only a handful of robberies and assaults annually. While Chief Cunningham may speak eloquently for his placid little town, he would seem an inapt choice to address issues related to the increasing crime seen in so many of America’s cities.