Obama: People Who 'Spew Hatred' Toward Muslims, Immigrants Feed 'Terrorist Narratives'

President Obama told a gathering of international dignitaries today that "all of us have a responsibility to refute the notion that groups like ISIL somehow represent Islam, because that is a falsehood that embraces the terrorists' narrative."

He also called on Muslim clerics and organizations to "push back not just on twisted interpretations of Islam" but "on the lie that we are somehow engaged in a clash of civilizations."

"Obviously, there is a complicated history between the Middle East, the West, and none of us I think should be immune from criticism in terms of specific policies, but the notion that the West is at war with Islam is an ugly lie. And all of us, regardless of our faith, have a responsibility to reject it," the president said.

"At the same time, former extremists have the opportunity to speak out -- speak the truth about terrorist groups. And oftentimes, they can be powerful messengers in debunking these terrorist ideologies. One said, 'This wasn't what we came for, to kill other Muslims.' Those voices have to be amplified."

Among other components of his anti-extremism plan already outlined, including jobs and good governance, Obama stressed ensuring "that our diverse societies truly welcome and respect people of all faiths and backgrounds, and leaders set the tone on this issue."

He noted "acts of anti-Semitism" in Europe, "or in some cases, anti-Muslim sentiment or anti-immigrant sentiment."

"When people spew hatred towards others because of their faith or because they are immigrants, it feeds into terrorist narratives. If entire communities feel they can never become a full part of the society in which they reside, it feeds a cycle of fear and resentment and a sense of injustice upon which extremists prey," Obama continued. "And we can't allow cycles of suspicions to tear at the fabric of our countries."

"So we all recognize the need for more dialogues across countries and cultures. Those efforts are indeed important. But what's most needed today, perhaps, are more dialogues within countries, not just across faiths, but also within faiths. Violent extremists and terrorists thrive when people of different religions or sects pull away from each other and are able to isolate each other, label them as 'they,' as opposed to us, something separate and apart."

So, Obama said, "let's share the truth of our faiths with each other."

He announced a program named after murder U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens "to connect 1 million young people from America and the Middle East and North Africa for dialogue."

"In some of our countries, including the United States, Muslim communities are still small and, you know, relative to the entire population. And as a result, many people in our countries don't always know personally somebody who is Muslim. So the image they get of Muslims or Islam is in the news. And given the existing news cycle, that can give a very distorted impression," he said. "A lot of the bad, like terrorists who claim to speak for Islam, that's absorbed by the general population; not enough of the good -- the more than 1 billion people around the world who do represent Islam, and are doctors and lawyers and teachers and neighbors and friends."

"So we have to remember these Muslim men and women, the young Palestinian working to build understanding and trust with Israelis, but also trying to give voice to her people's aspirations; the Muslim clerics working for peace with Christian pastors and priests in Nigeria and the Central African Republic to put an end to the cycle of hate; the civil society leaders in Indonesia, one of the world's largest democracies; parliamentarians in Tunisia working to build one of the world's newest democracies; business leaders in India with one of the world's largest Muslim populations; entrepreneurs unleashing new innovations in places like Malaysia, health workers fighting to save lives from polio and from Ebola in West Africa and volunteers who go to disaster zones after a tsunami or after an earthquake to ease suffering and help families rebuild, Muslims who have risked their lives as human shields to protect Coptic churches in Egypt and to protect Christians attending mass in Pakistan and who try to protect synagogues in Syria."

Obama reminded all that a Muslim police officer was killed in the Charlie Hebdo massacre and a Muslim employee saved Jews at the kosher grocery store.

"It's not a question of Jews or Christians or Muslims," he said. "We're all in the same boat, and we have to help each other to get out of this crisis."