No Wonder Romney Lost

It's politics 101 that you should know your enemy before going into battle. You have to know your opposition in the other party and the media too. Mitt Romney had virtually unlimited money at his disposal when he chose to run for president, and could have hired almost any political talent he wanted. He chose Stuart Stevens to be his chief strategist. Stevens appeared on Howard Kurtz's show over the weekend, and demonstrated that he didn't know the first thing about who his enemy really was during the campaign.

KURTZ: Do you believe today that much of the media is in the tank for Barack Obama?

STEVENS: Oh, it's -- it's not a yes or a no question. In the tank, I would say no. So, yes or no question? I would say no.

KURTZ: Too favorable to the president, too sympathetic to the president? How would you put it?

STEVENS: I think after that the election, you're going to have a lot tougher questions that are going to be asked because you're out of an election environment. I think you're seeing that this past weekend with this whole golf outing.

After the election, the "tough questions" matter a whole lot less.

With all due respect, Mitt Romney is a smart man but he hired a fool to be his chief strategist.