Wednesday's HOT MIC

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And now for something completely different...

And it's not Florida!

Happy Wednesday everyone.

On a potentially happier note, there's this:

The recent departure of FBI veteran Peter Strzok is the first known hitch in a secretive probe that by all public accounts is charging full-steam ahead. Just last week, news surfaced that Mueller's team had executed a search warrant at the Virginia home of Donald Trump’s former campaign manager, Paul Manafort. And the week before that ABC News confirmed Mueller is now using a federal grand jury in Washington, D.C., to collect documents and other evidence.

It's unclear why Strzok stepped away from Mueller's team of nearly two dozen lawyers, investigators and administrative staff. Strzok, who has spent much of his law enforcement career working counterintelligence cases and has been unanimously praised by government officials who spoke with ABC News, is now working for the FBI's human resources division.

He is no stranger to complex and controversial investigations.

As chief of the FBI's counterespionage section last year, he helped oversee the FBI's investigation into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server, and he took part in the FBI interview of the Democratic presidential candidate.

It's hard to say at this juncture what to make of this, but you can't help but wonder why someone who "helped" oversee the investigation (read: whitewash) of Hillary Clinton's private email server is not being forced out or quitting.  Whatever the story, it's got to be interesting. Does anyone have any thoughts?

 

Frankly, what's happening in our culture right now is depressing me so greatly I'm having trouble sleeping or concentrating. I feel anxious all the time - it's almost my natural state.  Things are that bad.  Our country seems to be having a nervous breakdown.  I was around in '68 too and, unlike Michael, I think it's much worse today.  Maybe that's because I was on the other side then (or sort of) but everything felt like a game in those days.  You knew it wouldn't last and Abbie Hoffman was a court jester, not a revolutionary.  Hippiedom was a fad, like "23 skidoo."  Even the Black Panthers - for all their violence - were less sinister than "Black Lives Matter" or Antifa.  It's not the second time as farce. It's the second time as social disintegration.

 

If you're unfamiliar with the Leftist phrase, "Direct Action," this video's for you:

Deb: "I never thought I'd live to see days like this." It's okay: you're young. I actually have lived to see days like this -- in 1968 -- and frankly I fully expected to see them return, and said so right here. (For which I believe I was lectured by some of the small children at National Review, who weren't even born in 1968, how today is nothing like 1968.) And now they have. Enjoy.

Brad Warner, my favorite living Zen master, posted this today:

People will deliberately misconstrue what you say in order to try to defend the view that it’s OK to punch Nazis.

Right now, there is someone out there trying to spin my words into something bizarre. Maybe they’ll tell folks I said that being against racism is the same as hating minorities or something along those lines.

They’ll know full well I never said anything remotely like that, even as they’re telling their friends I did. And their friends probably won’t read what I actually said, anyhow. Or if their friends do read what I wrote, they’ll read it the way it has been spun for them. That’s how the game works.

And yet, as a person committed to the Buddhist Way, my opinion is that it is not OK to punch Nazis.

Self-defense is acceptable in Buddhism, just like it is under the law. But the mere seeing of a swastika or some other object designated as a “symbol of hate” is not enough. Nor is most of what the kids these days are calling “hate speech.” The justification of self-defense must never be easy.

Personally, I do not care if all of my Facebook friends and Twitter contacts get together and decide it’s OK to punch Nazis. It is not OK to me. So I will not participate.

The MSM and establishment politicians are actively trying to whitewash and legitimize the violent communists of Antifa.

There is nothing wrong with acknowledging that there were violent extremists on both sides in Charlottesville and there's nothing wrong with drawing a "moral equivalence" between people who march under a Nazi flag and those who march under a Communist flag. Both ideologies led to millions of deaths.

I never thought I'd live to see days like this:

African-Americans team up to defend Confederate monuments.

In the wee hours of this morning, Baltimore removed Confederate monuments, including statues of Robert E. Lee and "Stonewall" Jackson. But other cities across the country are also planning to remove their monuments. Here's a comprehensive list.

This is my favorite story on the issue:

A group in Dallas has organized to protect the Confederate statues — and the group is mostly made up of African-Americans, CBS Dallas-Fort Worth reported Monday.

"I'm not intimidated by Robert E. Lee's statue. I'm not intimidated by it. It doesn't scare me," former city council member Sandra Crenshaw explained. "We don't want America to think that all African Americans are supportive of this."

Crenshaw has teamed up with some members of the Buffalo Soldier historical re-enactment group and Sons of Confederate Veterans to protect Dallas monuments. "Some people think that by take a statue down, that's going to erase racism," Crenshaw explained. She dismissed this idea as "misguided." She also defended the Freedman's Cemetery as a Civil War monument which helps heal racial wounds.

Wow. Talk about a narrative-buster.

Regarding the current hysteria, this is, as far as I am concerned, the bottom line: