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Tuesday's HOT MIC

Here is your HOT MIC for the day.

Watch this cop make an incredible court-length shot with his back facing the basket.

Impressive!

Alfie Evans can't go to Rome.

A judge in Britain just ruled that 23-month-old Alfie Evans cannot be flown to Rome to receive life-saving treatment, despite his recently granted Italian citizenship. Instead, he must stay in the Alder Hay Children's Hospital for "end of life care," also known as court-mandated death. British courts have ruled that Evans cannot be treated for his rare undiagnosed degenerative neurological condition, but must be "allowed to die."

On Monday night, the hospital removed the ventilator, but Evans did not die. Instead, he learned to breathe on his own.

LifeSite News's Dorothy Cummings McLean reports:

MANCHESTER, April 24, 2018 (LifeSiteNews) – UK toddler Alfie Evans may not fly to a hospital in Rome for treatment, a UK judge ruled this afternoon.

Parents Tom and Kate have now lost their legal challenge to remove their son from Alder Hey hospital and fly him to a hospital run by the Vatican in Rome. The judge, Mr Justice Hayden, called his ruling the “final chapter in the case of this extraordinary little boy.”

The judge indicated that it might be possible for Alfie to receive care at home “for his final days or hours.”

The hospital announced there would be a police presence, but did not explain why, "for the privacy of Alfie and his family."

Pope Francis made an appeal for Evans's treatment.

California: Come for the Unbreathable Air, Stay for the Financial Drain!

Kristin Tate has a great piece at The Hill today about the financial horror of living in America's bluest cities.

She writes from the perspective of a Manhattanite, but has plenty to say about the state and city that I recently departed:

in 2016 the Golden State lost almost 143,000 net residents to other states — that figure is an 11 percent increase from 2015. Between 2005 and 2015, Los Angeles and San Francisco alone lost 250,000 residents. The largest socioeconomic segment moving from California is the upper-middle class. The state is home to some of the most burdensome taxes and regulations in the nation. Meanwhile, its social engineering — from green energy to wealth redistribution — have made many working families poorer. As California begins its long decline, the influx outward is picking up in earnest.

Upper-middle class people tire of the tax burden, while those of use who are just middle-middle class grow weary out of being bled dry in every facet of life.

I've been back in my native Tucson for just about two months now and I'm still finding myself saying or thinking, "Really? That's all?" whenever I pay for anything.

I love Los Angeles, but I had a rent control deal that was the envy of most people who knew about it and I was still paying as much for a two bedroom bungalow as I would for a four bedroom house with a pool here.

It is unfortunate that liberal dominance is ruining most of America's great cities. It's something that has bothered me for a long time. I stayed in California for 22 years to fight to change things. Then I just decided to enjoy life for less money.

The savings on whiskey alone bring a sense of inner peace I've never known.

Word:

 

Looks like Parkland Boy Wonder Kyle Kashuv is playing hookie today.

The two will have a lot to talk about after what happened to Kashuv in school yesterday.

As I reported here, Kashuv says he was detained and "aggressively questioned" by two school security officers and one Broward County sheriff's deputy in the principal's office at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Monday, regarding pictures he had posted on Twitter about his trip to the gun range.

Kashuv said, "it definitely felt like they were attempting to intimidate me."

A PJ Media commenter who is a former cop had some salient thoughts on the matter.  "archer52" commented that Kashuv "should get an attorney and cash the check the BSO is going to write."

I was a cop for a generation in Florida. This is an unlawful detention. The second he felt he couldn't leave, was denied the use of his phone, no parent and had 3 deputies around him questioning him, that is an "arrest".

To make it worse, this is the same department under criticism. And the kid committed no crime. They know who he is, they were f-ing with him. Write the check. Go to college on their dime.