Thursday's HOT MIC

Here is today's HOT MIC.

A nice, non-political nightcap:

It's amazing what can be accomplished once you've figured out how to build an island.

This is rich coming from this guy:

From bitter clingers to saying a cop acted "stupidly" to his various overseas apology tours, The Lightbringer rarely met anyone whom he couldn't find disparaging words for. Heck, he didn't even have to meet them. He was more than willing to make sweeping, negative generalizations about different groups of people in America.

His Dale Carnegie turn here is, like so much of what he says and does, completely hollow.

Religion of Peace strikes again:

More from DailyMail.com:

A hard-line Saudi preacher has claimed women are to blame for their own rapes and are the 'cause of harassment and adultery'.

Ahmed Bin Saad Al Qarni delivered his abhorrent sermon on Twitter where he claimed 'women instigate men to rape and assault them'.

In one video he posted online, Al Qarni claimed 'look at the woman in this video, she made the men go mad. Don't blame men.'

A 21st Century media platform was used to deliver a message from the 10th Century. Peak 2017.

Finally, we're getting around to important news:

The article attempts to suck the fun out of eating candy, like suggesting that you store it in a place that isn't easy to get to. Then it provides the nutritional information, which no one is interested in.

Some candy I've never even heard of is at the top of the list but the venerable Reese's Peanut Butter Cups come in at number two, so there is some sanity in the world.

I stopped reading at "How to adult-ify your Halloween candy cravings."

The bastardization of the First Amendment continues apace:

More from CNN:

A federal appeals court has ruled that a 40-foot cross-shaped Maryland monument honoring soldiers who died in World War I is unconstitutional, saying it violates the separation between church and state.

The 4th US Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday that the 92-year-old structure was in violation of the First Amendment because it is on public land at a busy intersection in Prince George's County and is maintained with government funds. The court's decision does not address whether the monument should be removed or modified.

The defendants -- the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission and the American Legion -- argued that the cross had a nonreligious purpose and "does not have the primary effect of endorsing religion," according to the majority opinion written by Judges Stephanie Thacker and James Wynn.

But the appeals court in Richmond, Virginia, sided 2-1 with the American Humanist Association, an organization that advocates for secularism and represented several non-Christian residents of Prince George's County.

The 4th Circuit Court has been leaning in the wrong direction for a while now so this isn't terribly surprising. This incessant mangling of the First Amendment is wearisome. No one-and I'll bet on this-is feeling pressured by the state to become a Christian because there's a cross in a veterans cemetery.