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Erick Erickson writes at The Maven:

The political left is quite upset now that the Senate is deeply unrepresentative of the mob. Our founders chose the House of Representatives to be that house of Congress that represents the people. But the Senate represents the states. Under our constitution and history, the states matter. They are not semi-autonomous subdivisions of Washington, but are actually sovereign states with powers not replicated in Washington. And they also cannot lose their Senate representation.

The only portion of the entire United States Constitution that cannot be amended is the portion related to the make up of the Senate. Each state gets two senators and no amendment to the constitution can affect that representation unless the state losing its senators agrees.

So if the left is truly, genuinely upset about this they can either push for some sort of revolution, which will undoubtedly turn violent, or they can embrace federalism.

For what it's worth, I don't think the impulse for revolution is strictly coming from the left. I had a very heated discussion with a libertarian-leaning candidate for office (he's now a member of the Ohio legislation) who said the Constitution is dead and the only way to save the Republic (probably) is to take to the streets. I strenuously disagreed, as most sane people would, but there is no doubt that some of those who claim to be on our side hold that view.

But Erick is right that federalism is where this needs to go. Let California and New York continue to dig their graves while the free states continue to prosper. Of course, for that to succeed we'd need to take away a lot of the power the feds have to force states to comply with their mandates, particularly when it comes to education, the environment, and anything that remotely touches on so-called social justice.