Friday's HOT MIC

Here is your HOT MIC for today.

Um ...

No really:

Via the Detroit Free Press:

WASHINGTON — A lawyer who formerly worked for U.S. Rep. John Conyers, D-Detroit, and later ran an ethics watchdog group in the nation’s capital confirmed for the Free Press on Thursday that Conyers verbally abused her, criticized her appearance and once showed up to a meeting in his underwear.

My sentiments exactly.

 

The wages of "feminism":

Women are having fewer children than ever before and more are staying childless, new data reveals today. Women who turned 45 in 2016 had an average of 1.80 children, down from 2.21 for their mothers' generation, who turned 45 in 1944.

The same generation also had fewer children by their 30th birthday, suggesting women are having children later in life. Women who turned 45 last year had 1.06 children by 30 compared to 1.8 in their mother's generation.

In total, 18 per cent of women who turned 45 last year had no children at all, compared with 11 per cent of women in their mother's generation. The ONS said the figures, collected from birth registration data going back to the 1930s, defined 45 as the age by which most women had stopped having children.

Most of modern "feminism" seems dedicated to the proposition that a woman can only fully realize her potential by becoming more like a man. That this defies biology and is a surefire ticket to cultural extinction they see as features, not bugs.

While Colin Kaepernick keeps getting in the news for all the annoying reasons, it's good to occasionally see some NFL news that doesn't make you want to throw things.

From Business Insider:

The Minnesota Vikings' 30-23 win over the Detroit Lions on Thanksgiving was a big one for Minnesota. But for linebacker Everson Griffen, the day was memorable for a completely different reason.

Ahead of the game, Griffen's wife went into labor, prompting Griffen to watch the birth of his son over FaceTime.

"Seven pounds, 2 ounces, born right before the game, so I was doing my warm-up watching the birth on FaceTime," Griffen said after the game. "So wife is healthy, baby is healthy, we don't know his name yet, but it's not about that. I'm happy to have a new addition — three boys. I don't know what my wife is going to do. It'll drive her crazy. But we're 9-2, and it feels good winning."

After the game, Griffen decided to have some fun and crowdsource the new baby's name:

No word yet on what his wife thought about that.

Name suggestions can be left on Griffen's Twitter page: @EversonGriffen

Perhaps sensing a shift in the wind, the Los Angeles Times starts to hedge its bets on Robert Mueller:

But at 73, Mueller’s record also shows a man of fallible judgment who can be slow to alter his chosen course. At times, he has intimidated or provoked resentment among subordinates. And his tenacious yet linear approach to evaluating evidence led him to fumble the biggest U.S. terrorism investigation since 9/11. Now, as he leads a sprawling investigation aimed at the White House, Mueller’s prosecutorial discretion looms over the Trump presidency.

What follows is a litany of Mueller's spectacular failures, including cases against the Hell's Angels and Steven Hatfill:

The FBI focused on Steven Hatfill, a virologist at the U.S. Army’s laboratories at Ft. Detrick, Md. In January 2003, Mueller assured Congressional leaders in a closed-door briefing that bloodhounds had traced anthrax from the attacks to Hatfill. But Hatfill had no experience handling anthrax. Nor did he have access to anthrax stored at Ft. Detrick or elsewhere. Years later, the FBI would reject the bloodhound evidence as unreliable.

After media leaks fingered Hatfill, he sued the FBI and the Justice Department on privacy grounds. In June 2008, the government agreed to pay Hatfill about $5.8 million.

Not to mention the Edward Snowden affair:

In the summer of 2013, the White House asked Mueller to negotiate the release from Russia of Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor who stole volumes of classified material on U.S. surveillance operations at home and abroad. Snowden had fled to Moscow after leaking the data to journalists.

Lisa Monaco, the White House’s Homeland Security advisor, tasked Mueller to talk to Alexander Bortnikov, head of Russia’s internal security and counter-intelligence service, the FSB. For at least a week, Mueller called Bortnikov’s office, starting at 3 a.m. in Washington. Each time, the FBI director was turned aside without getting Bortnikov on the line.

“Mueller just kept calling over there, like begging to talk to the guy,” said a former official. Instead, Snowden was granted asylum in Russia.

The Trump investigation's in the very best of hands.

Try to control your mirth as Salon makes the case for... Hillary 2020!

1. Hillary Clinton is the Winston Churchill to Vladimir Putin's Adolf Hitler.

2. Hillary Clinton being elected president (at last) would monumentally piss off misogynistic trolls, and what's not to like about that? 

3. By winning the popular vote convincingly in 2016, Hillary Clinton has earned the right to be considered the presumptive nominee in 2020.

Wait, wait! There's one more!

4. We can expect her to be a good president.

That ability to get things done, by the way, is why Clinton had high approval ratings as secretary of state (usually in the 60s), even proving more popular than President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden in 2011 and 2012. Her stock may be low now, but it's been low in the past (such as when she "ran" to be first lady in 1992), and it has always recovered. Arguably the big political question facing a potential Hillary 2020 campaign will be whether that bounce occurs at a fortuitous moment for her. It very well could, and wouldn't that be a giant helping of the dish best served cold?

These people are certifiable.