Hollywood Hit Hard by ObamaCare

It's a real three-hanky movie, this one:

Hollywood productions, for instance, might find it irksome simply trying to categorize employees as full- or part-time, seasonal or variable, and it's important that they get the classifications right lest they face hefty fines. "ACA is thousands of pages, and it wasn't written with this industry in mind," says Belcher.

One of the unintended consequences, say some industry insiders, is that it could lead to productions running to foreign countries, given that ACA doesn't apply to U.S. citizens working abroad. Some also say the number of production days in the U.S. are likely to be cut due to ACA because there's a 90-day waiting period before productions must either pay a penalty or offer health insurance to full-time workers. That rule provides big incentives for a production to wrap in less than three months. While big-budget movies and season-long TV shows might not have such a luxury, smaller films or TV pilots could easily rush their schedules to make sure they come in at under 90 days.

Don't worry: Obama's big-ticket blockbuster donors won't be harmed; just the guys who need to work for a living. And it's not like California needs the jobs.