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Godless Militants Go After Alabama Town

Winfield, Alabama, is a sleepy little town not far from Birmingham where about 5,000 people work, live, and worship - a city where the year's biggest event is Mule Day every September.

Winfield has also become the site of a fight over religion. Because the greatest defense against theocracy is an attack on a tiny Southern town, militant atheists have targeted the town over a proclamation the mayor and city council issued back in December of last year "acknowledging the blessings of God and expressing a desire to seek Divine guidance."

Over the next several weeks, the city received blistering letters of condemnation from the American Civil Liberties Union and Freedom From Religion Foundation decrying the alleged violation of separation of church and state. The FFRF letter was particularly harsh, suggesting that God was the mayor’s “imaginary friend” and that, if God did exist, he probably did not care about the small Alabama town.

The Pacific Justice Institute has come to the defense of Winfield, citing recent rulings that support the town's proclamation and its decision to stand behind it.

In response, PJI sent a letter to Mayor Randy Price late Friday, pointing out the proclamation’s consistency both with recent cases and historic American traditions. The PJI letter noted the omission in either the ACLU or FFRF letters of failed attempts by those groups to mount similar legal challenges. Within the last few years the FFRF lost a legal challenge to President Obama’s continuation of the National Day of Prayer proclamation, and the ACLU lost a case where it had sued over Ohio’s state motto, “With God all things are possible.” Court decisions in this area have also allowed local proclamations and resolutions to voice anti-religious sentiments. For instance, the federal Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld the right of San Francisco officials to issue scathing denunciations of religious groups and the Catholic Church, in the name of free speech.

PJI's president, Brad Dacus, weighed in:

This proclamation does not compel or coerce anyone to do anything.  As with any governmental action, not everyone is going to like it, but that doesn’t make the proclamation unconstitutional.

Here's hoping that, in the end, Winfield will prevail against the forces trying desperately to be the squeaky wheel against the First Amendment.

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Featured image courtesy of Shutterstock / Marcos Mesa Sam Wordley