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GM Is Alive. Drivers Are Dead. Any Questions?

According to her boss, the nation's chief executive, no one in particular. In President Obama's mind, businesses just happen to grow and develop their own cultures, like fungus. No one takes credit for a fungus culture; why should anyone take credit for a business culture? Whether you succeed or fail, the administration's credo is, "You didn't build that!"

GM officially confirms up to 13 deaths; trial lawyers are likely to raise the number to 60. Is that a fair cost of keeping GM alive? If so, how many lives and billions of taxpayer dollars will it take before the cost of this administration's meddling with the economy becomes prohibitive? At what point will it stop being fair and become criminal?

Ayn Rand's prophetic novel Atlas Shrugged has a chapter in which hundreds of people on a crowded train lose their lives because railroad employees have stopped taking responsibility for their actions. Their failure to take responsibility was a consequence of the nation's new culture of "fairness" and "equality" that was being promoted by an intrusive "progressive" government. In a twist of dark irony, all the participants in the story were fully supportive of that "fair" culture -- from the corrupt government officials to the cowardly railroad executives to the clueless passengers who never figured out what had doomed them to die in a smoke-filled tunnel.

It seems that today the Obama administration, the "progressive" politicians, the unions, and all their low-information supporters, many of whom are driving GM's small, fuel-efficient cars, are writing an updated, real-life version of Atlas Shrugged, in which the story of General Motors is the latest contribution to this man-made dystopia.

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