FBI Criminal Informant Complicit in Brian Terry's Death (PJM Exclusive)

The federal government will still not reveal if one of the two WASR-10 AK-pattern semi-automatic rifles located near the scene -- provided to the Sinaloa cartel via Operation Fast and Furious -- was the weapon that put a bullet through Brian Terry's heart. The existence of a third recovered gun, an SKS carbine, has been disputed by the FBI despite the fact it had been talked about openly in the beginning of the investigation among federal agents.

Multiple sources tell PJM that this third weapon "disappeared" because it was the weapon carried by the FBI CI who ran the rip crew. When it was recovered near the scene of the murder and subsequently traced by the ATF, it traced back to the FBI CI via the gun shop in Texas where it was purchased.

Deconfliction is a major element of high-risk undercover law enforcement work. Undercover agents and informants often cross jurisdictional paths, and deconfliction is the process whereby agencies warn off other agencies so that their assets don't end up in conflict, putting investigations and lives at risk.

In this case, the FBI and DEA failed to deconflict. Neither agency bothered to warn Border Patrol to keep their BORTAC teams out of Peck Canyon that evening. As a direct result of this FBI and DEA failure -- combined with Homeland Security forcing BORTAC units to carry less-lethal beanbag rounds in some of their primary weapons -- Brian Terry's under-armed four-man unit walked into an ambush against a heavily armed rip crew, at least five of whom were carrying rifles.

Brian Terry's murder was entirely preventable. The incompetence of the DEA and FBI let his Border Patrol unit walk into an ambush. After the ambush, it appears the FBI tampered with evidence to cover up that one of their informants was involved with the murder of a federal agent.

The government has recently sealed the case against the only suspect the FBI chose to keep behind bars.