Dems Say Need to Block 'Stomach Churning' Plastic Printable Gun is Urgent

A New York Democrat wants to revise gun laws to encompass a downloadable plastic gun produced on a 3-D printer.

On Friday, Defense Distributed premiered its plastic firearm with only one small necessary metal part: the firing pin.

Rep. Steve Israel (D-N.Y.) wants to pour water on this invention with his Undetectable Firearms Modernization Act, which extends a 1988 ban on plastic guns that expires this year and extends it to include homemade, plastic high-capacity magazines and receivers. The piece of metal in the downloadable gun, which allows it to be spotted by metal detectors, keeps it within current law.

“Security checkpoints, background checks, and gun regulations will do little good if criminals can print plastic firearms at home and bring those firearms through metal detectors with no one the wiser. When I started talking about the issue of plastic firearms months ago, I was told the idea of a plastic gun is science-fiction. Now that this technology appears to be upon us, we need to act now to extend the ban on plastic firearms," Israel said.

Israel "revamped" his bill to make it "illegal to manufacture, own, transport, buy, or sell any firearm, receiver, or magazine that is homemade and not detectable by metal detector and/or does not present an accurate image when put through an x-ray machine."

Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) was so alarmed by Friday's demonstration video of the downloadable gun that he called a Sunday news conference to jump on board Israel's bill.

"We're facing a situation where anyone — a felon, a terrorist — can open a gun factory in their garage, and the weapons they make will be undetectable," Schumer said. "It's stomach churning."

The senator clarified he doesn't want to ban 3-D printers outright.

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